Barriers will help reduce fatalities on Malahat

I drove the Malahat for 10 years on a daily commute to work in Victoria, and now also drive frequently as a retired person.

So, sadly, another life lost on the Malahat.

I drove the Malahat for 10 years on a daily commute to work in Victoria, and now also drive frequently as a retired person.

I have been within a half hour of many cross-over accidents due to drinking, medical emergencies, drowsiness, loss of traction, and texting.

It could have been me in those accidents.

I clean my windows and lights to help in the rain and fog. I keep a good distance between myself and the next car, and my tires are top notch.

None of that can help if a car crosses over.

Barriers have saved my life twice — on the way out of Goldstream going north, a tire came bouncing down the road on the other side having come off a car I passed later on.

It would have hit me but bounced off the barrier and into the ditch on the other side instead.

Another time, the car in front of me blew out a tire, zig-zagged and finally hit the barrier and not an oncoming car thus avoiding a multiple car collision which could have included me.

Once, I was just lucky when there was no barrier. Going south on the highway to Victoria, a stag plunged off a hill onto the highway right in front of the car ahead of me, who unavoidably hit the deer, spinning it to the other side, and the opposing cars able to stop.

I am just an average person and all of this has happened to me.

The Malahat used to be a quieter road, but now so many more hundreds use it as a daily commute to Victoria and vice-versa for jobs, shopping and medical appointments.

I am happy to hear the government has pledged to put in the remaining barriers along the route. It will greatly reduce these devastating accidents.

 

Marilyn Bowman

Shawnigan Lake