Getting kids young key to stopping swearing

A million thanks to Philip Wolf for addressing the issue of swearing.

A million thanks to Philip Wolf for addressing the issue of swearing.

Having lived an eon or two, I have seen and unfortunately heard, many changes in our society. Some good, some bad. Some things that are bad and seemingly will be with us forever. But, the disgusting language so commonly used today is something that can be changed.

It requires a little effort. First, we have to stop accepting this scourge as if it’s perfectly OK. It is not!

I was probably in my early teens the first time I heard the F-word. Luckily for me, I didn’t ask either of my parents what it meant. A friend was only too happy to fill me in. Now it is used by some so young they are still using baby talk. How sad. As sad as are young women who think this is sophisticated and grown up and cool. The older ones who use it are already a lost cause. Perhaps it’s because they think it’s the only way to get attention? Either way, they gain nothing, least of all respect.

I was fortunate enough to have been married for 55 years to a big, strong, decent man. Six foot four and 215 pounds of muscle. Many called him “Big Al”. He was often called to settle a situation that was becoming violent, not only because of his strength, but because he was respected.

He never had to physically intervene, but resolved the situation with calm and good sense — no cuss words!

I never, ever heard him use the F-word in front of me or our children. However, he was a logger. I am told he could swear in three languages when the situation called for it. He chose the right place.

How do we change this habit? First, be sure your children don’t grow up hearing mom and dad use it. Second, we let those who use it know it’s not OK. If they get nasty, tell them they must be intellectually challenged, but only if you have back-up. Another four-letter word is ‘love.’

 

Peggy Cetinski

Duncan