Tom Paterson

Shaun Payne

Chronicles: A fire, a plane and more in today’s headline grab-bag

The historic Cassidy Inn Hotel was one of only three surviving structures from the former coal mining town of Granby.

Shaun Payne
Front page of the ‘Seattle Post-Intelligencer’ telling of the loss of the S.S. Coast Trader off Cape Flattery in June 1942.

Wreck of Second World War freighter raises fears of leaking oil

Because Capt. Havens had contented himself with posting lookouts the Japanese submarine had easily closed to within firing range.

Front page of the ‘Seattle Post-Intelligencer’ telling of the loss of the S.S. Coast Trader off Cape Flattery in June 1942.
A house packed with dynamite and a lit stove proved fatal in Cobble Hill  in 1916.

Exploding Clague stove in 1919 was déjà vu all over again

“The kitchen looked as though a bomb had been thrown into it.” —Cowichan Leader.

A house packed with dynamite and a lit stove proved fatal in Cobble Hill  in 1916.
Vandals struck Maple Bay’s historic Pioneer Cemetery this month.

Maple Bay’s Pioneer Cemetery, conclusion

In this third and final instalment we wrap up our visit to the Valley’s oldest cemetery which was desecrated by vandals two weeks ago.

Vandals struck Maple Bay’s historic Pioneer Cemetery this month.
Vandals recently damaged more than a dozen headstones at the cemetery.

Maple Bay’s Pioneer Cemetery, part 2

Some of Cowichan’s earliest pioneers, the Morleys, the Fletts, the Aitkens, among others, take their rest here

Vandals recently damaged more than a dozen headstones at the cemetery.

‘Thank you, Doris, and bless you. I’ll see you later’

Of them all, Doris Benjamin, a member of the pioneering Cobble Hill Dougan clan, has been my most stalwart editorial aide.

Joe Gordon: cop killer’s last will and testament, conclusion

Joe Gordon was born in Montreal in 1923 but grew up in Vancouver, the last of eight children ruled by an alcoholic and harsh father.

The inside of an Oakalla prison cell.

Joe Gordon: A cop killer’s last will and testament, part 1

“This is not a tirade against society.” —Joe Gordon, writing within days of his execution.

The inside of an Oakalla prison cell.
Nanaimo’s Jack Hardcastle didn’t set out to become famous as an artist

Jack Hardcastle: marine artist extraordinaire

They used to turn up fairly often, in antique stores and at shows, sometimes at flea markets

Nanaimo’s Jack Hardcastle didn’t set out to become famous as an artist
The Quamichan Inn had long been a local landmark until it burned down on Friday night.  The home was built in the early 1900s and was named ‘Farleigh’.

T.W. Paterson: Cowichan’s Quamichan Inn originally ‘on the outskirts of civilization’

With the inn’s total and tragic loss in Friday night’s fire, Mrs. Adams can finally hang up her apron.

The Quamichan Inn had long been a local landmark until it burned down on Friday night.  The home was built in the early 1900s and was named ‘Farleigh’.
The Cowichan Valley Museum and Archives

There’s treasure aplenty in our Cowichan Valley museums

A visit to the museum and archives can offer a fascinating peek into our history

The Cowichan Valley Museum and Archives
Genuine Singer sewing machines cost from $50 to $200 depending on features

Nanaimo’s war of the sewing machines turned to print

His competitor’s machines, sneered John Hilbert, “are like the razors of the old song, made for sale and not for use.”

Genuine Singer sewing machines cost from $50 to $200 depending on features
Left

What did the Canadian government do for its veterans?

Instead of being offered “the pick of the country” in 1917, veterans were being offered picks and shovels

Left
The former Moose Lodge on Quamichan Lake is now the Duncan Community Lodge.

Volunteer loggers financed Loyal Order of Moose Lodge

When Duncan Moose Lodge celebrated its 50th anniversary in August 1996, charter member Stan Clarke recounted how they came to buy the estate

The former Moose Lodge on Quamichan Lake is now the Duncan Community Lodge.
The government took over distribution of alcohol.

Prohibition couldn’t stand up to profit

As we saw last week, Archibald Tiderington of Lake Cowichan, was charged with bootlegging

The government took over distribution of alcohol.
A case full of whisky got one local in trouble in 1920

Chronicles: Prohibition days justice: the case of the leaking trunk

After Canada implemented prohibition, returned servicemen were soon agitating for a return to the bad old days.

A case full of whisky got one local in trouble in 1920
On the National Day of Mourning

Chronicles: Monuments to the fallen: not all are remembered equally

Friday, April 28, was National Day of Mourning for workplace fatalities.

On the National Day of Mourning

Cook was a hero despite sinking

Thomas McIntyre “clung to the side about half an hour then said goodbye, waved and winked feebly, and drifted off to his death.”

Naval museum honours tragic HMCS Esquimalt (Part 1 of 2)

Although she served her brief career entirely in the Atlantic, the minesweeper had enjoyed a special place in the hearts of Victorians.

Chronicles: Looking back at previous ‘Chronicles’

The Bank of Canada has received no fewer than 18,000 names of Canadian women as candidates for having their picture on a new banknote.

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