Dokie Ridge wind farm near Chetwynd B.C. in 2010. B.C.’s existing wind energy is mostly near the Peace River dams in northeastern B.C. (Black Press files)

Site C allows more wind, solar energy, experts say

Lawyer, economist argue for completion of B.C. Hydro dam

The union group that has built B.C. Hydro dams since 1961 has made one more push to convince the John Horgan government to complete the Site C dam, releasing two reports by independent consultants making the case that it’s the best option for ratepayers.

Energy lawyer Jim Quail and energy economist Marvin Shaffer both concluded that the B.C. Utilities Commission underestimated the benefits of the third dam on the Peace River, and overestimated the performance of alternatives if the dam project is stopped. They argued that the commission overlooked Canada’s climate change commitment to price carbon emissions up to $50 a tonne, and the potential to sell power to Alberta as it phases out its coal-fired generation.

The commission was given a deadline of Nov. 1 to make recommendations to the B.C. government on how to proceed. Both criticized the commission’s idea of substituting wind, geothermal or other sources to meet growing electricity demand, and pointed to the likely increase in clean energy needed in a future where carbon taxes are heading higher.

Geothermal power is unproven in B.C. and the most significant issue for adding wind or other intermittent power is that there be sufficient backup when it isn’t producing, Quail said.

“A resource like [Site C] makes it possible to go much further when it comes to using wind power and other renewables,” he said.

Shaffer pointed out that the commission did not consider greenhouse gas emission effects for the dam, which has been under construction for two years and would cost an estimated $4 billion to shut down and restore the site near Fort St. John.

Shaffer calculated that shutting down Site C and then finding alternatives to replace its output would cost $1-2 billion more than completing it, even if its cost rises to $10 billion as the commission suggested it might.

Both experts noted that the previous B.C. Liberal government left a difficult situation by proceeding with the most expensive construction project in B.C. history without having the commission review it first.

“There’s nothing but bad news for ratepayers of the next few years under B.C. Hydro,” Quail said. “There’s all kinds of cost pressure. Which trajectory is less painful is the question.”

Chris Feller, president of the union group Allied Hydro Council of B.C., agreed.

“The new B.C. NDP government has been left a disturbing legacy by the former B.C. Liberal government, but now it has to make the best of it,” Feller said.

Premier John Horgan said Wednesday the cabinet is still gathering information to make a decision by the end of the year on proceeding. Deputy ministers of energy and finance have asked the utilities commission for technical details on B.C. Hydro debt and other issues.


@tomfletcherbc
tfletcher@blackpress.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Board declines to see new information in controversial Cowichan Bay rezoning

CVRD board now prepared for consideration of third reading and adoption

3 Cowichan salmon projects get $7,400 grants

The funds came from the Pacific Salmon Foundation’s Community Salmon Program

Crasa explodes to help Caps take three points

Cowichan falls in shootout at home, beats Kings in Powell River

Brothers in Cowichan Valley win big in lottery for 2nd time

Playimng same numbers net big wins over a three year period

Two Cowichan Tribes families devastated by duplex fire

Carla Sylvester sat in her vehicle, on Tuesday morning, with tears in… Continue reading

VIDEO: #MeToo leader launches new hashtag to mobilize U.S. voters

Tarana Burke hopes to prompt moderators to ask about sexual violence at next debate

Potent power play paces Canucks to 5-1 win over Detroit

Miller nets a pair as Vancouver wins third straight

UPDATE: British couple vacationing in Vancouver detained in U.S. after crossing border

CBP claims individuals were denied travel authorization, crossing was deliberate

After losing two baby boys, B.C. parents hope to cut through the taboo of infant death

Oct. 15 is Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness Day in B.C.

Cheating husband sues mistress for gifted ring after wife learns about affair

The husband gave his mistress $1,000 to buy herself a ring in December 2017

B.C. massage therapist reprimanded, fined for exposing patients’ breasts

Registered massage therapist admits professional misconduct

B.C. boosts legal aid funding in new payment contract

‘Duty counsel’ service restored in some communities, David Eby says

Rugby Canada helps recovery efforts in Japan after typhoon cancels final match

Canadian players wanted to “give back in whatever small way they could”

VIDEO: Bear spies on cyclists riding by on Campbell River street

Riders seem unaware the bruin is mere feet away on the side of the road

Most Read