Stew Coates, left, and Dave Whiskin, of the Ramcos Car Club, show off some of the super items gathered for the Station Sale and Flea Market held in May 1978 to help raise money to move and restore the abandoned CP Railway Station as a museum to house the district’s artifacts.

Stew Coates, left, and Dave Whiskin, of the Ramcos Car Club, show off some of the super items gathered for the Station Sale and Flea Market held in May 1978 to help raise money to move and restore the abandoned CP Railway Station as a museum to house the district’s artifacts.

LAKE FLASHBACK: We’ve got the end of the trail, a long and winding trail, and the Trans Canada Trail this week

Looking back at these old newspapers really brings home how much the area has changed over 40 years

Welcome to Lake Flashback. Reporter Lexi Bainas has been combing through oldnewspaperswiththeassistance of the Kaatza Station Museum and Archives so we can jog your memory, give you that nostalgic feeling, or just a chuckle, as we take a look at what was making headlines this weekaround Cowichan Lake in years gone by.

This week around the Cowichan Lake area…

10 years ago:

At the end of May, 2008, the Lake Cowichan Gazette gave some coverage to the Trans Canada Trail.

“You can start a hiking trek across Canada from right here,” the story began.

“The Trans Canada Trail stretches about 15,000 kilometres from Newfoundland to B.C. with its most western point at the Town of Lake Cowichan.

“If going across the country is more than you want to commit to, there are opportunities for much shorter treks. You can access the Trans Canada Trail at the kiosk on Wellington Avenue between A&W and Pharmasave. From there, just follow the signs. This portion of the trail is walked every day by residents, including students going to and from school.

“Slicing through thick forests along the old Canadian national Railways right of way, the trail crosses the Cowichan River at several locations on refurbished trestles, including Mile 66 Trestle.

“There are many beautiful views of the river along the trail. The goal is to eventually have the Cowichan Valley portion of the trail connect with the famous Galloping Goose Trail in the Victoria area.”

The author pointed out that the historic Kinsol Trestle was “impassable” in 2008 but that is no longer the case. It’s open and a beautiful addition to a trip by anyone wanting to take the trail to Lake Cowichan.

25 years ago:

“They all want the Brown House” said The Lake News on June 2, 1993.

“The Brown House [an old building at that time located opposite the post office on Coronation Avenue in Lake Cowichan] has roused nothing but interest since council announced it would have it burned down. The latest interest came from three men from Marble Bay who appeared before council asking to rent it for at least six months. They want to sculpt marble ware for sale to tourists.

“The men were Larry Smith, Larry Bratvold, and Dan Cline, the sculptor. They brought work with them samples of their work: an elephant figurine, a whale’s tail, and birds.

“At one time it seemed that no one wanted the Brown House — the old teacherage. Council tried last year to give it to the Kaatza Historical Society. They turned it down. Then it was advertised. No takers. The seniors asked council to give them the land the Brown House sits on. They want to expand the Seniors’ Centre.

“Council decided two meetings ago to let the firemen burn the old house down for practice. Then, two people wanted it. They would remove the Brown House, leaving the land clear.”

Councillors were cogitating.

Coun. Leon Portelance remarked there is a shortage of business space in the Village.

“I get two or three enquiries a week,” he said.

40 years ago:

In The Lake News of May 31, 1978, we learn that the long and winding trail towards converting the movie theatre on North Shore Road into an apartment had moved to the public hearing stage.

That meant things were getting serious.

“The hearings are required by law before council can change the village’s zoning bylaw and community plan to allow the change from commercial use to residential. The village must also enter into a land use contract with the owner of the building, Lachman Sanghera, because it does not meet site coverage requirments.

“Council gave three readings to bylaws that would allow the zoning change and alter the community plan at last Tuesday’s council meeting. Council must wait until after the public hearing [before] giving bylaws final adoption.

“On the same date, council has scheduled a public hearing into a zoning application by Darshan Johel that would remove land he owns near Grants [Lake] from urban reserve and place it in a residential category to allow a housing development to proceed.”