Marilyn Turner, Doreen Sharrat, and Terry Bergman from Arbutus Ridge watch as LPGA pro Dawn Coe-Jones makes a shot at March Meadows. The three women were the winners, at a fundraiser, of a chance to golf with the Lake Cowichan legend. (Gazette 2007)

Marilyn Turner, Doreen Sharrat, and Terry Bergman from Arbutus Ridge watch as LPGA pro Dawn Coe-Jones makes a shot at March Meadows. The three women were the winners, at a fundraiser, of a chance to golf with the Lake Cowichan legend. (Gazette 2007)

Woodland Shores, a logging road along the Cowichan River, and vandalism at WFI were hot July items.

Forest land of one kind and another was heavily in the news in the summers of 1977, 1992, and 2007.

Welcome to Lake Flashback. Reporter Lexi Bainas has been combing through old newspapers with the assistance of the Kaatza Station Museum and Archives so we can jog your memory, give you that nostalgic feeling, or just a chuckle, as we take a look at what was making headlines this week around Cowichan Lake in years gone by.

10 years ago:

In July 18, 2007 Lake Cowichan Gazette, there was much concern about a plan to develop what is now known as Woodland Shores.

The main criticism of the proposal for 378 residential units on the Bald Mountain Peninsula was the single access along Marble Bay Road.

“I think the proponent is trying to do a good project, but I think traffic is a huge issue for us,” said Lorne Scheffer, who lives on Sunset Park just off Meade Creek Road.

“There is no way to get to this property except on a narrow road.”

Scheffer suggested buying some Crown land to provide a second access.

“I’m very concerned about the intersection at Meade Creek Road and Youbou Road,” he said.

“That’s where traffic will increase. There have been three deaths there because people have pulled out onto an 80-kilometre zone…We need to have a turning lane.”

That sentiment was repeated throughout the four-hour meeting, with pedestrian safety another top priority.

Proponent Wayne Hopkins of Merdyn Development Group from Victoria said the Ministry of Transportation won’t decide about that intersection until it knows the density. “We’re prepared to do whatever they want,” he said. “The road access will be improved.”

25 years ago:

“Should there be a road along the river?” asked The Lake News in July of 1992 in its leading story.

“The ministry of forests wants to put a logging road along the picturesque Cowichan River corridor. So says the public Advisory Committee, set up by the provincial government, which is making a study of the corridor, with a report due next year.

Three meetings had been scheduled on the subject: one in Duncan, one in Sahtlam, and one in Lake Cowichan.

“During the planning process, the Ministry of Highways offered to lease the CN right-of-way to an appropriate body as a recreational trail,” the story said, adding, “Park plans designate the right-of-way for cycling, hiking, and horseback riding.

“The Ministry of Highways, the controlling agent for the right-of-way has received an application from the Ministry of Forests for the use of the right-of-way for log hauling from the Stoltz Flats area through to Glenora along the south side of the river,” the story said.

40 years ago:

“Western Forest Industries latest victim in rash of vandalism” was the headline in July 1977.

An ongoing problem spread to the company’s Honeymoon Bay mill site.

“Company spokesman Ken Irving said vandals entered the mill site early one morning recently and damaged a tractor by driving it into an oil drum. A window at the shingle mill was broken and the bundle press was started.

“A night watchman observed three men leaving the scene but was unable to identify them.

“The incident is not the first such attack on WFI’s property recently. The company has offered a $100 reward leading to the arrest of the culprits.”

Other Lake area logging operations, including Crown Zellerbach and Macmillan Bloedel have had property destroyed by vandals recently. MB is considering closing off some of its logging roads as a result of the vandalsim.