Cowichan filmmaker Harold Joe’s latest project, ‘Dust ‘n Bones’, is onscreen at the Cowichan Performing Arts Centre Friday, Oct. 26 at 7 p.m. (Lexi Bainas/Citizen file)

Cowichan filmmaker Harold Joe’s latest project, ‘Dust ‘n Bones’, is onscreen at the Cowichan Performing Arts Centre Friday, Oct. 26 at 7 p.m. (Lexi Bainas/Citizen file)

‘Dust ‘n Bones’, is onscreen at the Cowichan Performing Arts Centre

Film examines controversies and mysteries that threaten the preservation of First Nations artefacts

Victoria-based Drama Camp Productions, a collaboration of Cowichan First Nations filmmaker Harold C. Joe and Less Bland Productions, will host a pre-screening of the feature length version of their thought-provoking documentary Dust n’ Bones on Friday, Oct. 26 at 7 p.m. at the Cowichan Performing Arts Centre.

Tickets are $10 for everyone. Phone 250-748-7529 or go online to http://cowichanpac.ca/.

A question and answer session will follow the screening of the 70-minute version of the documentary.

According to Leslie Bland, Dust n’ Bones examines the legal issues, political controversies and historic mysteries that threaten the preservation and rededication of First Nations artifacts, burial sites, and remains.

Framed around the impending transfer of funerary artifacts from the Royal BC Museum to traditional Cowichan territory, these themes are realized through the perspective of Joe, a Cowichan former gravedigger, filmmaker and archaeological consultant.

Complementing both his personal and professional journey are perspectives from the archaeologists, elders, professors, and museum curators he encounters through his work.

The insights of these subjects are told through one-on-one interviews hosted by Joe, as well as through dramatic recreations, archival and creative location footage that speaks to their experiences.

A 45-minute version of Dust n’ Bones is currently streaming on www.YouTube.com/STORYHIVE.

Dust n’ Bones will broadcast on APTN Second Window in Canada with a broadcast premiere date to be announced, and on FNX in the U.S. on Oct. 19.

In addition to support from Telus Storyhive, APTN, and FNX, Dust n’ Bones is supported by Creative BC, the Rogers Telefund, Film Incentive BC, the Canadian Film or Video Production Tax Credit, and the National Screen Institute.

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