During a duel for Instagram “likes” Dani (Sierra Compton) reacts to Cameron’s (Noah Bird’s) excitement over his latest selfie. (Photo by Hayley Picard)

Two plays at Duncan’s QMS tackle relationships

for teenagers, technology has created a whole new world of challenges

Queen Margaret’s School students are taking on the fraught subject of relationships in subText: a series of vignettes, and Bees, an original short play at their fine arts hall from Nov. 27-29.

These days are hard, and for teenagers, technology has created a whole new world of challenges and potentially funny pitfalls.

Written by Tyler Dwiggins, subText is a humorous series of vignettes that explores the awkwardness of dating today. From breaking up over misspelled texts and the importance of capturing the perfect selfie, to taking relationships to the next level by updating your Facebook status, finding (and keeping) love has become very complicated.

Susanna Cai (Amelia, Grade 12), explains that subText is a modern reflection of dating.

“In our part of the play, we explore how two completely different people can remain together.”

Yet, for this spelling-bee queen, dating Ed (Olivia Kelly, Grade 12) who struggles to write perfect texts, can be challenging.

“The play highlights how we can be ourselves with each other and that we don’t have to change,” says Olivia. “It’s funny how texts can create such a struggle in a relationship.”

Veteran actors Noah Bird (Cameron, Grade 9) and Sierra Compton (Dani, Grade 12), who have performed together in two other local drama productions, bring a stage rapport that lends authenticity to their struggle for Instagram supremacy.

“SubText is an exaggeration of life as a teenager,” explains Noah.

“It’s overly dramatic,” adds Sierra. “But it’s pretty correct on how we can get caught up in the moment and the results get captured online.”

Following a short intermission, the scene will shift to Bees, an original short play written by QMS Alumni Winter Koyote (‘19). Bees is a complex exploration of team dynamics, leadership, the power of collaboration, and surviving the throes of teenage life. Through struggle, trust (and the lack thereof), Ace, Kid, Champ, Lulu, Bug, Chica, and Shrimp must learn to work together or risk spending a very cold night stuck in an escape room.

The curtain rises on the double feature of subText and Bees Nov. 27-29, 2019 at 7 p.m. in the Queen Margaret’s School Fine Arts Hall. Tickets are $10 in advance, or at the door (if available). Contact 250-746-4185 or email reception@qms.bc.ca.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Baby Bear statue returned to be reunited with Mama and Papa

Culprit left it near the Henry Road roundabout in Chemainus with a note attached

Cowichan Estuary Nature Centre launches new project

The Nature Centre’s goal is to continue to engage the local community

Isles offence picks up against Peninsula

Kerry Park better at both ends of the ice in winless weekend

Water levels in Cowichan Lake high after recent wet weather

Snow pack in local mountains also looking good

VIDEO: Hear sultry jazz songstress Laila Biali in speakeasy setting in Cowichan

Cabaret Series at Cowichan Theatre closes its 2019/20 season with super show

VIDEO: Kenney wants feds to approve Teck mine for benefit of First Nations

‘Surely [reconciliation] means saying yes to economic development for First Nations people’

VIDEO: Canada looking to help 126 Canadians quarantined in China for coronavirus

China has confirmed more than 4,500 cases of the new virus, with more than 100 deaths

Alessia Cara to host and perform at 2020 Juno Awards

Multi-platinum Canadian singer-songwriter also up for six awards, including Artist of the Year

Watch out for scams, clickbait in the wake of Kobe Bryant’s death: Better Business Bureau

Kobe Bryant and his daughter were killed in a helicopter crash near Los Angeles

‘Very disrespectful’: Headstones at Okanagan cemetery damaged by excavation crew

Headstones at Enderby’s Cliffside Cemetery mistakenly driven over by excavation crew

Despite reports of decline, birds flocking to national parks in Canadian Rockies

Recent studies suggest overall bird population has slid by three billion since 1970

Former UN committee member defends stance on B.C.’s Coastal GasLink pipeline

First Nations LNG Alliance accused UN committee, human rights watchdog of not doing their research

Opioid crisis to blame for shorter life expectancy in B.C. men, says Stats Can

Opioid crisis held responsible for declining life expectancy

Most Read