VIDEO: Kathy White celebrates 40 years of dancing

Kathy White welcomes everyone to her 40th anniversary show Saturday, June 16. (Lexi Bainas/Citizen)Kathy White welcomes everyone to her 40th anniversary show Saturday, June 16. (Lexi Bainas/Citizen)
Kathy White thanks Ian Rothnie for his support of Scottish tradition. (Lexi Bainas/Citizen)Kathy White thanks Ian Rothnie for his support of Scottish tradition. (Lexi Bainas/Citizen)
Another Day of the Sun features White’s choreography from 2017. (Lexi Bainas/Citizen)Another Day of the Sun features White’s choreography from 2017. (Lexi Bainas/Citizen)
Blue Bonnets is Scottish traditional dance. (Lexi Bainas/Citizen)Blue Bonnets is Scottish traditional dance. (Lexi Bainas/Citizen)
Julia, Eira, and Alinya dance to ‘McDougal, McNab, and McKay’, first choreographed by White in 1988. (Lexi Bainas/Citizen)Julia, Eira, and Alinya dance to ‘McDougal, McNab, and McKay’, first choreographed by White in 1988. (Lexi Bainas/Citizen)
Julia, Eira, and Alinya dance to ‘McDougal, McNab, and McKay’, first choreographed by White in 1988. (Lexi Bainas/Citizen)Julia, Eira, and Alinya dance to ‘McDougal, McNab, and McKay’, first choreographed by White in 1988. (Lexi Bainas/Citizen)
’Home’, performed in graceful white dresses, offers the freshness of the highlands on a hot afternoon. (Lexi Bainas/Citizen)’Home’, performed in graceful white dresses, offers the freshness of the highlands on a hot afternoon. (Lexi Bainas/Citizen)
Highland dancing sometimes takes a nautical turn, like it does here in ‘Lukey’s Boat’. (Lexi Bainas/Citizen)Highland dancing sometimes takes a nautical turn, like it does here in ‘Lukey’s Boat’. (Lexi Bainas/Citizen)
In Leapin’ Leprechauns, choreographed in 1997, the dancing takes an Irish turn. (Lexi Bainas/Citizen)In Leapin’ Leprechauns, choreographed in 1997, the dancing takes an Irish turn. (Lexi Bainas/Citizen)

Do you remember watching the Kathy Monk Dancers during the summer festival in the centre of Duncan?

Have you attended Robbie Burns nights and enjoyed the breath of the highlands as a group of performers leap to the pipes?

Maybe you’ve followed the dancers themselves, watching them grow more skilled as they matured, taking that new confidence into their adult lives.

That’s the real legacy of Kathy White’s 40 years of teaching highland dancing, sharing her passion for Scottish culture with two generations of students.

At a special show recently at the Christian Reformed Church, White and her family, friends, and students celebrated four decades with dances young and old, (and dancers young and old, too). The pipes skirled and the graceful feet flew as White showcased her choregraphies going back as far as 1970.

It was a day to remember for everyone.