B.C. man helps find piece of aviation history

At the bottom of Lake Ontario was once a lost piece of Canada’s aviation history

A search for underwater treasure has panned out for a Salmon Arm Secondary graduate.

At the bottom of Lake Ontario was a lost piece of Canada’s aviation history – a piece which has now been found.

Nine prototype test-plane models of the infamous Avro Arrow jet were created and launched into Lake Ontario between 1954 and 1957. It was confirmed Sept. 8 that one of the models has been found on the floor of Lake Ontario.

Former Salmon Arm resident David Shea is vice-president of engineering for Kraken Sonar Systems. The Newfoundland-based company has developed a programmable submarine, known as the ThunderFish, an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) with an advanced sonar system to allow for searching with far clearer results than traditional sonar.

Shea was previously part of the successful Arctic search for the ships lost in the 1845 Franklin Expedition.

On Friday, July 28, the team from Kraken began work on the Raise the Arrow project, a collaboration between several private companies, including Osisko Mining, working with the Canadian Coast Guard and the Royal Canadian Military Institute to find these scale models. The nine prototypes are roughly one-eighth the size of the full-sized aircraft.

Image of Avro Arrow model captured by Kraken’s AquaPix® Synthetic Aperture Sonar

The team, which includes the scientists and archaeologists, is based in an area near Point Petre.

“We are so proud of our engineers who helped locate an Arrow free-flight model,” says Karl Kenny, Kraken’s president and CEO. Our advanced Canadian ocean technology plays a big part in this story, where our world-class underwater sensors and robotics helped find a piece of Canada’s aviation history.”

The effort has uncovered sonar images, pictures and underwater video of the model. The next step will be to send divers to assess the condition of the model, which will remain submerged until recording and preservation work can be completed. The hope it to eventually bring the model to the surface and where it could become part of the collections at the Canada Aviation and Space Museum in Ottawa and the National Air Force Museum of Canada in Trenton, Ont.

Shea was part of the team searching an area of 64 square kilometres, with Kraken’s AUV moving in a lawnmower-like grid pattern to look for the models.

While the team knew a few details of where the test models were launched and the angle at which they were launched, no one really had much of an idea where they might have landed.

Shea previously told the Observer the Kraken team had a theory that previous search efforts estimated the planes were much farther out in Lake Ontario than initially thought.

“I believe that if we are looking in the right area, we are going to find them,” he accurately predicted at that time.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

 

Photo contributed The ThunderFish, Kraken’s autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) with an advanced sonar system to search the floor of Lake Ontario for scale models of the Avro Arrow.

Comments are closed

Just Posted

Renovated Lake Cowichan town hall will include emergency operations centre

Upgrade project expected to be complete within months

Business notes: Realtors raise $10,000 for Nourish Cowichan

The latest from Cowichan’s business community

North Cowichan mayor answers questions about new RCMP detachment

The current building went up in 1980, when there were 30 people working there.

B.C. Supreme Court dismisses claim against Island Corridor Foundation

Snaw-Naw-As (Nanoose) First Nation was seeking return of reserve land as railway sits unused

13 new B.C. COVID-19 cases, Langley Lodge outbreak ends

Health care outbreaks down to four, 162 cases active

Two injured hikers airlifted from North Vancouver Island Park

Campbell River and Comox Search and Rescue hoist team rescued the injured from Cape Scott Provincial Park

Alberta health minister orders review into response after noose found in hospital in 2016

A piece of rope tied into a noose was found taped to the door of an operating room at the Grande Prairie Hospital in 2016

B.C.’s major rivers surge, sparking flood warnings

A persistent low pressure system over Alberta has led to several days of heavy rain

B.C.’s Indigenous rights law faces 2020 implementation deadline

Pipeline projects carry on as B.C. works on UN goals

‘Mind boggling’: B.C. man $1 million richer after winning Lotto 6/49 a second time

David O’Brien hopes to use his winnings to travel and of course keep playing the lottery

B.C. teacher loses licence after sexual relationships with two recently-graduated students

The teacher won’t be allowed to apply for a teaching certificate until 2035

Lower Mainland teacher facing child pornography charges

Elazar Reshef, 52, has worked in the Delta School District

Most Read