Licensing fees for dogs in Duncan are going up in the new year. (File photo)

Duncan to raise dog licensing fees

New fees in line with surrounding jurisdictions

Dog licence fees are going up in Duncan.

Council decided at its meeting on Oct. 21 to raise the fees starting in the new year, with early payment incentives and reduced rates for spayed and neutered dogs.

Starting in 2020, the regular fees for neutered or spayed dogs will rise from the current $16 to $20, and the fees will rise again to $25 in 2021.

The licensing fees for dogs not neutered or spayed will rise from $35 to $40 next year, and $45 in 2021.

Fees for dogs determined to be aggressive or dangerous will depend on if the dog has successfully completed the Canadian Kennel Club’s canine good neighbour program.

RELATED STORY: DUNCAN LOOKS TO CHANGE RULES AROUND AGGRESSIVE DOGS

The licensing fee for a dog determined to be aggressive or dangerous is $200, but it will drop to $75 after the course is completed if the owner enters into a compliance agreement with the city.

“Due to the additional administrative cost associated with the licensing requirements for dangerous or aggressive dogs, staff recommend setting this fee higher than the fees of an unaltered dog licence,” said Paige MacWilliam, Duncan’s director of corporate services, in a staff report.

The City of Duncan currently receives approximately $8,000 annually from dog-licensing fees, which partly offsets some of the cost of providing animal control services at $22,000 annually.

Increasing the licensing fees could result in up to an additional $3,000 in revenue each year.

MacWilliam said dog licensing fees in Duncan have not risen in many years, and the raise brings the fees in line with surrounding jurisdictions.



robert.barron@cowichanvalleycitizen.com

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