(Pixabay photo)

Economy added 27,700 jobs in May, unemployment rate hit record low at 5.4%

Economists on average had expected the addition of 8,000 jobs for the month

The economy added 27,700 jobs in May, while the unemployment rate fell to its lowest level since comparable data become available in 1976, Statistics Canada said Friday.

The unemployment rate fell to 5.4 per cent compared with 5.7 per cent in April as the number of people looking for work fell sharply, it reported.

READ MORE: B.C. housing slump has begun to slow economy, credit union economists say

The better-than-expected increase in the number of jobs follows a record 106,500 jobs that were added in April.

Economists on average had expected the addition of 8,000 jobs for the month and an unemployment rate of 5.7 per cent, according to Thomson Reuters Eikon.

Year-over-year average hourly wage growth for all employees, a key indicator monitored by the Bank of Canada ahead of its interest-rate decisions, was 2.8 per cent in May, up from 2.5 per cent in April.

The increase in jobs was made up entirely of full-time employment as there was no change in the number of part-time jobs.

The overall gains were driven by an increase of 61,500 in the number of self-employed workers, while the number employees fell by 33,800 including a drop in 13,100 public sector employees and 20,700 private sector employees.

The goods-producing sector of the economy added 4,900 jobs, while the services sector added 22,800.

The health care and social assistance industry added 20,400 jobs in the month, while professional, scientific and technical services increased by 17,200.

Business, building and support services lost 19,400 jobs and employment in accommodation and food services fell 12,000.

Regionally, Ontario added 20,900 jobs in May, while B.C. saw the number of jobs rise by 16,800. Newfoundland and Labrador lost 2,700 jobs for the month.

Compared with May 2018, the Canadian economy added 453,100 jobs including 299,000 full-time positions and 154,100 part-time jobs.

By province:

— Newfoundland and Labrador 12.4 per cent (11.7)

— Prince Edward Island 9.0 (8.6)

— Nova Scotia 6.5 (6.9)

— New Brunswick 7.2 (8.0)

— Quebec 5.0 (4.9)

— Ontario 5.2 (6.0)

— Manitoba 5.0 (5.2)

— Saskatchewan 5.2 (5.4)

— Alberta 6.7 (6.7)

— British Columbia 4.3 (4.6)

Craig Wong, The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Rod Peters resigns as mayor of Lake Cowichan

Byelection expected in the fall

Cowichan RCMP looking for someone who shone laser at aircraft

Several instances reported over Cowichan Valley

Cowichan’s Waldon Park ready for Gord Closson Classic

the Gord Closson Fall Classic will kick off its second half-century this August 21-23

Sonia Furstenau column: MCFD needs overhaul of requirements for social workers

BCASW advocating for mandatory registration for social workers with B.C. College of Social Workers.

B.C. records 146 new COVID-19 cases through long weekend

More that 28 people tested positive for the virus each day since Friday

Canucks tame Minnesota Wild 4-3 to even NHL qualifying series

J.T. Miller leads Vancouver with goal and an assist

COVID-19 vaccine efforts provide hope but no silver bullet to stop pandemic: Tam

There are more than two dozen vaccines for COVID-19 in clinical trials around the world

Two people die in propane heated outdoor shower near Princeton

Couple was attending a long weekend gathering

Study shines light on what makes LGBTQ+ youth feel safe in a community

The study goes beyond looking at school or family supports

Alberta to require masks at schools this fall, but still no mandate in B.C.

B.C. students are also set to return to classrooms in September

B.C. to allow customers to buy cannabis online for in-store pickup at private shops

Age verification will still be required inside the store

30% of British Columbians would ‘wait and see’ before taking COVID vaccine: poll

Some are concerned about side effects, while others don’t think the virus is a big deal

Most Read