Island Health is launching a campaign to encourage people who use needles to return them safely. (Citizen file)

Island Health launches needle-awareness campaign

Encourages support of local needle-recovery efforts

Island Health is launching a campaign to encourage people who use needles to return them safely.

The campaign will remind people to “make it your gig to return your rig” and support local needle-recovery efforts.

The Cowichan Valley, like much of the rest of the province, is grappling with addiction and drug issues that have led to a provincial emergency being called in 2016 to try and deal with the growing crisis.

RELATED STORY: ISLANDERS SHARE PAINFUL EXPERIENCE WITH OPIOID ADDICTION

The ongoing emergency is also seeing drug paraphernalia, particularly used needles, being discarded in parks, alleys and other public places. This has added to the urgency of the situation.

Dr. Shannon Waters, Island Health’s medical health officer for the Cowichan region, said that with discarded needle boxes now spread throughout the Valley at various locations, and designated places to pick up fresh needles and drop off used ones, efforts are being made to control the situation.

“The vast majority of needles are being returned after use, but not all of them,” Waters said.

“We have the (Warmland) Sharps Pick-Up Team in place in the Valley that picks up used needles, and we’re looking at getting the community’s stakeholders together for a collaboration to further target discarded needles. We also want those who use substances to get involved and help keep their communities free of this debris.”

RELATED STORY: OFFICIALS STEPPING UP TO COLLECT GROWING NUMBER OF DISCARDED NEEDLES

Waters said the province’s strategy to deal with B.C.’s drug crisis, which has seen hundreds of deaths over the last few years, has had successes.

She said there have been no deaths at any of the nine overdose prevention sites, including the one in Duncan, that the province has opened on Vancouver Island since 2016 as part of its response to the opioid overdose emergency.

Waters added that the growing availability of naloxone kits to counteract and prevent overdoses has also had some positive results.

“But there is a stigma around mental health and substance abuse, so many people choose to do their drugs alone, where no one is around to assist them if they overdose,” Waters said.

“We need to collectively work on this problem together as a community.”

A health bulletin released by Island Heath encourages drug users to use a fresh needle every time to reduce the transmission of HIV, hepatitis B and C, and ensure the needles are safely disposed of when used.

More can be learned about harm reduction at https://towardtheheart.com/about

“Sometimes discarded needles are found in public areas,” the release stated.

“Safe disposal of needles saves others from getting hurt accidentally. Fortunately, the risk of being infected by an accidental needle stick is rare.”

The release also offers advice as to how to properly pick up and dispose of discarded needles:

• Don’t try to replace the cap on needles

• Don’t snap, break or bend needles

• Pick up needles with care; use work gloves and tongs if available

• Hold needle point away from you

• Put needle in a metal or hard plastic container with a lid

• Replace cap on container securely and label it

• Wash hands thoroughly with soap and water

• Drop off the sealed container at your local public health unit or at a community drop box

Harm reduction supplies, including needles, can be picked up at, and needles can be returned to, Island Health’s Margaret Moss Health Unit on Canada Avenue and the overdose prevention site on Trunk Road.

Needles can also be picked up and dropped off at Warmland House on Lewis Street and the Cowichan Tribes/First Nations Health Authority.

Needle drop-off boxes in the Valley are located at:

1) Meade Creek Recycling Dropoff Depot, 8855 Youbou Rd.

2) Peerless Road Recycling Dropoff Depot, 10830 Peerless Rd.

3) Evans Park Ball Field, 6257 Somenos Rd.

4) Sherman Road Soccer Park, 3272 Sherman Rd.

5) Canada Avenue public restroom, 100 block Canada Avenue

6) Duncan Mental Health Unit, 3088 Gibbins Rd.

7) Centennial Park, 325 First St.

8) Ts’ewulhtun Health Centre, 5768 Allenby Rd.

9) Heiwa Park, Canada Avenue (north)

10) Margaret Moss Health Unit, 675 Canada Ave.

11) Cowichan Valley Food Bank, 5810 Garden St.

12) Train station, 120 Canada Ave.

13) Cowichan Aquatic Centre, 2653 James St.

14) Warmland House, 2579 Lewis St.

15) McAdam Park, 820 Wharncliffe Rd.

16) Duncan Public Works Yard, 1091 Marchmont Rd.

17) Somenos Creek Dog Park, 2355 Beverly St.

18) Kin Park, 5801 Alderlea St.

19) York Road

20) Rotary Park, 545 Al Wilson Grove



robert.barron@cowichanvalleycitizen.com

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