It is hypocrisy to deny duty to veterans

Chemainus – It’s unfortunate that the phenomenon known to texters as TMI (Too Much Information) means news that should have caused an uproar among Canadians, entirely slipped by me.

Late last year Legion Magazine featured an article that briefly mentioned the class-action suit brought against our government by a relatively small group of modern-day veterans. I say our government, because it’s important to note that these are the people to whom WE gave the right to make vital decisions on our behalf. The suit alleges that one of those decisions, the Canadian Forces and Veterans

Re-establishment and Compensation Act, violates the rights of veterans injured in the course of their assigned military duties.

The first attempt to bring this action was denied on the basis of the contention of government lawyers that the suit had no chance of success and that it was frivolous. Since one of the claimants had lost both legs, an eardrum and a testicle while serving our government’s priorities, I’m not convinced that “frivolous” quite covers the situation. Thankfully a judge from the British Columbia Supreme Court agreed, and the suit continued.

Not being a lawyer, I won’t attempt to offer an opinion on whether the action should succeed or not. What I do take issue with is the language used by government-employed lawyers and other like-minded federal bureaucrats to deny there is just cause for the action.

Our government’s contention is that they owe no special moral or social obligation to veterans. Further, they argue, and I quote: “…there is no sacred duty owed by the government to its veterans”. That government purports to speak for you and for me.

When military action by our country results in tragic disruptions to the lives of those sent to do our bidding, it is obscene hypocrisy to deny our sacred duty to them.

Irene Hawkins

Chemainus

Just Posted

Crofton Alternate Water Supply Project eliminates boil water advisories

System takes away the need to utilize Crofton Lake in the event of a disruption to mill source

Chemainus sea walk plans get a boost

North Cowichan to sign right-of-way agreements with VIHA

North Cowichan/Duncan RCMP warn against leaving dogs in cars on hot days

Community Canine Heatstroke Responder program now being used

CVAC Jaguars climb podium at Garriock

Host team earns more than 90 medals

VIDEO: B.C. First Nation plans to launch legal challenge after Trans Mountain approval

Meanwhile, Premier John Horgan says he’ll continue to defend the B.C. coast

Coming up in Cowichan: Spend Father’s Day fishing, or head to the BC Forest Discovery Centre

Deadline coming to register for class reunion The Cowichan Secondary Class of… Continue reading

B.C. ‘struggling’ to meet needs of vulnerable youth in contracted care: auditor

Auditor general says youth in contracted residential services may not be getting support they need

Pair of B.C. cities crack Ashley Madison’s “Infidelity Hotlist”

Data from the website reveals Abbotsford and Kelowna hottest spots for cheaters

Life’s work of talented B.C. sculptor leads to leukemia

Former Salmon Arm resident warns of dangers of chemical contact

Billboard posted along B.C.’s Highway of Tears to remember missing and murdered Indigenous women

Billboards featuring Indigenous artwork to be placed in Surrey, Kamloops and near Prince George

Federal cabinet ministers visit Edmonton, Calgary, in wake of TMX approval

Natural Resources Minister Amarjeet Sohi is set to visit Trans Mountain Corp.’s terminal in Edmonton

B.C. municipality prepares to forbid overnight camping by homeless despite court ruling

While courts have ruled against blanket bans, Langley City is employing a site-by-site approach

B.C. auditor says Indigenous grad rate highest ever but education gaps exist

The percentage of Indigenous students graduating from B.C. public high schools has hit its highest level ever

Most Read