Legalizing prostitution leaves vulnerable unprotected

Saltair – If prostitution is legalized that won’t make it legitimate. To be legitimate a law must serve its intended purpose, which appears to be allowing prostitutes the safety of controlled work environments, otherwise known as brothels.

A noble thought for some; a business opportunity for others.

This because only those who could meet requisite standards of employment would receive the protection of such employment, while it would appear that those folks are already largely well self-protected.

Meanwhile the most vulnerable of all – those who for mental, health or social reasons couldn’t or wouldn’t meet requisite standards – would be rendered even more vulnerable by leaving them to work the streets where they would be the remaining prey for those who would not choose or dare to use a house or, worse, for the Picktons of the world.

The real beneficiaries of these proposed changes to the law are the business people who would own and operate brothels.

Not unexpectedly, it seems that those pressing for legalization are seeking a means of furthering their own interests. At least equal efforts of our government brain trust should be directed at correcting the

problems experienced by those most vulnerable as well as at enacting stronger penalties for those choosing to victimize those most vulnerable.

Pat Mulcahy

Saltair

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