Local bylaws trump lifting of open burning ban

“People who intend to conduct an open burn must first check with their local government to ensure that there are no additional local bylaws”

Open fires are now permitted in the Coastal Fire Centre’s jurisdiction due to a decreased risk of wildfires in the region. That is not to say, however, that they are allowed in every municipality as every local government has its own set of rules and regulations.

“The rescinding of the open burning prohibition applies to all B.C. parks, crown lands and private lands, but does not apply within the boundaries of a local government that has forest fire prevention bylaws and is serviced by a fire department,” said a press release issued by the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations.

“People who intend to conduct an open burn must first check with their local government to ensure that there are no additional local bylaws or restriction in place that might regulate open burning.”

While burn barrels, open burning, fireworks and tiki torches are now permitted in certain areas, chances are local bylaws restrict or prohibit those activities so check with your local government before you light a match.

In North Cowichan and CVRD electoral areas A (Malahat/Mill Bay), B (Shawnigan Lake), C (Cobble Hill), D (Cowichan Bay) and E (Cowichan Station/Sahtlam/Glenora), backyard burning is generally permitted between mid-October and mid-November, albeit with regulations.

Backyard burning is banned completely in other local municipalities, including the City of Duncan, the Town of Ladysmith and the Town of Lake Cowichan.

For more information contact your local government directly.