An international study by Teladoc Health shows 42 per cent of 18-25 year olds feel burnt out at work often or all the time, compared to 29 per cent of 18-65 year olds. (Unsplash)

Mental health impacts job performance of 61% of young adults: study

International study reveals generational differences in mental health

A new study says mental health challenges are hitting younger workers harder.

In an international study by Teladoc Health, 61 per cent of 18-25 year olds say mental health symptoms have affected their job performance.

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The study, conducted by Ipsos Mori, interviewed 3,974 online participants between 18-65 years old from four different countries: 1,000 from the U.S., 1,000 from the United Kingdom, 964 from Canada and 930 from Australia.

More than 35 per cent of workers between 18-25 years old had been diagnosed with a mental health problem compared to 27 per cent of all respondents.

Responses also showed two thirds (67 per cent) of 18-25 year olds worry about their mental health compared to 47 per cent of all ages.

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Younger workers also expressed more feelings of burnout and stress – 42 per cent feel burnt out at work often or all the time, compared to 29 per cent of all respondents, and 41 per cent often feel stressed or anxious at work, compared to 30 per cent of all respondents.

Of the Canadian respondents, 27 per cent have felt stressed or anxious at work and 55 per cent believe they would be more productive at work if there was better mental health support.

In June, the B.C. government announced a new 10-year-plan to reduce barriers to mental health and addictions care called A Pathway to Hope. The plan includes funding for non-profit counselling services for youth, eight more Foundry centres and funding for two First Nations-operated treatment centres.

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