FILE – Emergency kits can be created at home with tips from PreparedBC (Black Press Media file)

Most British Columbians agree the ‘big one’ is coming, but only 50% are prepared

Only 46 per cent of British Columbians have prepared an emergency kit with supplies they might need

The looming “big one” is a common water cooler conversation among British Columbians as researchers keep a close eye on the tectonic plates below. But a new poll suggests that when a destructive earthquake does hit, most will not be prepared.

READ MORE: Vancouver Island overdue for the big one, can also expect mega-thrust tsunami

According to Research Co. poll results released Wednesday, 46 per cent of British Columbians have prepared an emergency kit with supplies they might need.

That comes despite 76 per cent of the 800 B.C. residents surveyed agreeing that is “very likely” or “moderately likely” that an earthquake strong enough to damage buildings will occur in the next 50 years.

Aside from significant tremors, 79 per cent of respondents are most concerned about wildfires, followed by 68 per cent concerned about earthquakes, 65 per cent about high winds and 61 per cent about intense rainfall.

That’s compared to 54 per cent voicing concern about a terrorist attack, 46 per cent worried about tsunamis and 56 per cent about heavy snowfall.

READ MORE: 200 tremors recorded near Vancouver Island due to ‘tectonic dance’

Of those who do have emergency kits prepared, 39 per cent have also put together an emergency plan which includes how to get in touch with family or friends, and 35 per cent have mapped out a meeting place for if an emergency does strike.

PreparedBC recommends including items such as more than three days worth of non-perishable foods, four litres of water per person, battery-powered flashlights and a first-aid kit.

Other items include:


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