A proposal to build a biogas plant in Cobble Hill that would use manure from dairy farms and food waste to create renewable energy is being opposed by a number of its neighbours. (File photo)

Neighbours raise fears over proposed Cobble Hill biogas facility

Proponents claim it will be state-of-the-art operation

Plans for a biogas plant in Cobble Hill are raising the ire of some of its neighbours.

A group of neighbours of the proposed facility have formed the “No Biogas Here” organization and held a meeting on Aug. 21 to rally against the plant, known as Cobble Hill Biogas, which they claim would be bad for the area.

“We are not opposed to biogas technology, but we are opposed to the location (of this proposal),” said No Biogas Here member Donna Boyd.

Cobble Hill Biogas is a co-operative that has been formed between four local dairy farms located in Cobble Hill and Cowichan Bay that hope to construct an on-farm biogas plant at a closed-down poultry farm on La Fortune Road.

RELATED STORY: FARM MANURE COULD BE VIABLE ENERGY SOURCE, CANADIAN RESEARCHERS SAY

The operation intends to convert 20,000 tonnes of dairy manure per year and 19,000 tonnes per year of unused food into biogas.

The biogas would be converted into 100,000 gigajoules per year of renewable natural gas, enough to heat 1,100 Vancouver Island homes every year, and sold to FortisBC.

According to information on Cobble Hill Biogas’s website, the production of clean RNG will reduce local carbon dioxide emissions by 9,800 tonnes a year, the equivalent of taking 2,100 vehicles off the road.

RELATED STORY: COWICHAN BIO-DIESEL CO-OP OPENS SECOND FUEL PUMP IN THE VALLEY

The website said the operation will also produce a nutrient-rich organic fertilizer and clean water as byproducts that will be returned to local farms to grow crops.

But Boyd said the neighbours have a number of concerns with the project’s proposed location.

“This is a large industrial process that doesn’t belong in a residential area with more than 600 homes within a three-kilometre radius,” she said.

“The two other on-farm biogas operations in B.C. are on much larger farms with no residential properties nearby. The property also sits on the boundaries of two major aquifers and the plant would likely increase the risk of contamination.”

RELATED STORY: INSIDE LOOK AT B.C. BIOFUEL FACILITY THAT TURNS FOOD TO FUEL

Boyd said there are also concerns about the odours from the facility.

“We have been assured that there will be little or no odour beyond the property line, but odour doesn’t recognize property lines or boundaries,” she said.

“Research has shown that odour has been a continuing problem with biogas plants. This will impact the quality of life and property values for the local residents and businesses. We also have additional concerns about increased truck traffic, fire risks, flare stacks, noise and the financial feasibility of the project.”

Josh Larson, one of the proponents of Cobble Hill Biogas, said he was surprised that some of the project’s neighbours are opposed to such an environmentally friendly project that comes with benefits to local farmers.

“We thought it would be championed by the neighbours,” he said.

“We had no idea it would be received by some this way, and it has taken us totally off guard.”

Larson said the facility, if given the green light to proceed by the Cowichan Valley Regional District and other regulatory bodies, will be a top notch, state-of-the-art operation that will not be a problem for the area and the neighbours.

The CVRD has yet to review and write a staff report on the proposal.

“We’ve done the research and the guys we plan to build it helped write the standard for biodigesters in Canada,” Larson said.

“There wouldn’t even be any smells outside the borders of the facility itself, much less the borders of the property. Facilities like this are in operation close to schools and hospitals around the world.”

Larson acknowledged that the two other on-farm biogas facilities in B.C. are in much more wide and open places than Cobble Hill Biogas, but it’s the nature of the Cowichan Valley to have farms situated among residential areas, and it’s supported by local zoning bylaws.

“We have no intention of being a nuisance to our neighbours,” he said.

“We want to improve lives. I’m just a farmer and a straight shooter, and I’m hoping the truth of this proposed operation will come out eventually.”



robert.barron@cowichanvalleycitizen.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Kerry Park’s Isles drop two to division rivals

Goalies were a big deal in both of the Kerry Park Islanders’… Continue reading

Roosters defended in North Cowichan

Council decides not to ban them on smaller properties

Construction for underground utilities on Chemainus Road commencing

Fourth-month project will result in traffic disruptions

Guest column: A year of progress at the Cowichan Valley Regional District

I’m excited about what we can achieve together in the year ahead.

Cowichan United continues to rule the road

Cowichan United continued to play the role of road warriors in Div.… Continue reading

VIDEO: Canadian allergists’ group wants Benadryl behind the counter due to side effects

Some doctors say the medication is over-used because of its easy availability

Yelling at your dog might hurt its long-term mental health: study

Researchers find dogs trained using negative reinforcement are more ‘pessimistic’

Vancouver Island soap company releases Lucky Lager beer soap

Beer-infused olive oil soap comes out just in time for holiday shopping

Jagmeet Singh says he’ll vote against throne speech if NDP requests not met

Singh is to meet with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on Thursday

Community uses loophole to paint 16 rainbow crosswalks after B.C. council says no

So far 11 rainbows are painted and five planned, all since council denied the first proposal in September

Workers’ camp at LNG facility in Kitimat takes shape

Extensive worker camp now being assembled

Former B.C. youth pastor guilty on one of five sexual assault allegations

Judge cites reasonable doubt in finding Cloverdale couple not guilty of majority of charges

238 and counting: Vancouver gelato shop sets Guinness World record for most flavours

Vince Misceo has come up with 588 different flavours over the decades

Killer who fled to Taiwan day after shooting B.C. man over $80 sentenced 13 years later

The sentence comes 13 years after Shaoxin Zhang, 19, was killed in a Burnaby parking lot

Most Read