A proposal to build a biogas plant in Cobble Hill that would use manure from dairy farms and food waste to create renewable energy is being opposed by a number of its neighbours. (File photo)

Neighbours raise fears over proposed Cobble Hill biogas facility

Proponents claim it will be state-of-the-art operation

Plans for a biogas plant in Cobble Hill are raising the ire of some of its neighbours.

A group of neighbours of the proposed facility have formed the “No Biogas Here” organization and held a meeting on Aug. 21 to rally against the plant, known as Cobble Hill Biogas, which they claim would be bad for the area.

“We are not opposed to biogas technology, but we are opposed to the location (of this proposal),” said No Biogas Here member Donna Boyd.

Cobble Hill Biogas is a co-operative that has been formed between four local dairy farms located in Cobble Hill and Cowichan Bay that hope to construct an on-farm biogas plant at a closed-down poultry farm on La Fortune Road.

RELATED STORY: FARM MANURE COULD BE VIABLE ENERGY SOURCE, CANADIAN RESEARCHERS SAY

The operation intends to convert 20,000 tonnes of dairy manure per year and 19,000 tonnes per year of unused food into biogas.

The biogas would be converted into 100,000 gigajoules per year of renewable natural gas, enough to heat 1,100 Vancouver Island homes every year, and sold to FortisBC.

According to information on Cobble Hill Biogas’s website, the production of clean RNG will reduce local carbon dioxide emissions by 9,800 tonnes a year, the equivalent of taking 2,100 vehicles off the road.

RELATED STORY: COWICHAN BIO-DIESEL CO-OP OPENS SECOND FUEL PUMP IN THE VALLEY

The website said the operation will also produce a nutrient-rich organic fertilizer and clean water as byproducts that will be returned to local farms to grow crops.

But Boyd said the neighbours have a number of concerns with the project’s proposed location.

“This is a large industrial process that doesn’t belong in a residential area with more than 600 homes within a three-kilometre radius,” she said.

“The two other on-farm biogas operations in B.C. are on much larger farms with no residential properties nearby. The property also sits on the boundaries of two major aquifers and the plant would likely increase the risk of contamination.”

RELATED STORY: INSIDE LOOK AT B.C. BIOFUEL FACILITY THAT TURNS FOOD TO FUEL

Boyd said there are also concerns about the odours from the facility.

“We have been assured that there will be little or no odour beyond the property line, but odour doesn’t recognize property lines or boundaries,” she said.

“Research has shown that odour has been a continuing problem with biogas plants. This will impact the quality of life and property values for the local residents and businesses. We also have additional concerns about increased truck traffic, fire risks, flare stacks, noise and the financial feasibility of the project.”

Josh Larson, one of the proponents of Cobble Hill Biogas, said he was surprised that some of the project’s neighbours are opposed to such an environmentally friendly project that comes with benefits to local farmers.

“We thought it would be championed by the neighbours,” he said.

“We had no idea it would be received by some this way, and it has taken us totally off guard.”

Larson said the facility, if given the green light to proceed by the Cowichan Valley Regional District and other regulatory bodies, will be a top notch, state-of-the-art operation that will not be a problem for the area and the neighbours.

The CVRD has yet to review and write a staff report on the proposal.

“We’ve done the research and the guys we plan to build it helped write the standard for biodigesters in Canada,” Larson said.

“There wouldn’t even be any smells outside the borders of the facility itself, much less the borders of the property. Facilities like this are in operation close to schools and hospitals around the world.”

Larson acknowledged that the two other on-farm biogas facilities in B.C. are in much more wide and open places than Cobble Hill Biogas, but it’s the nature of the Cowichan Valley to have farms situated among residential areas, and it’s supported by local zoning bylaws.

“We have no intention of being a nuisance to our neighbours,” he said.

“We want to improve lives. I’m just a farmer and a straight shooter, and I’m hoping the truth of this proposed operation will come out eventually.”



robert.barron@cowichanvalleycitizen.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Caps improve to 3-0

Lynn and Arquiett score two each as Caps double up Chiefs

Carving in Cowichan provided road to recovery for stroke victim

“I didn’t know if I’d be able to get out of bed or walk, let alone carve”

Sarah Simpson Column: Use your smarts to slow down early holidays

It’s Friday the 13th. There’s a full moon. A rabid bat is… Continue reading

Island pair helps BC to baseball title

Cowichan’s Ella Duncan-Reda and Oak Bay’s Tess Sawkins integral to provincial success

VIDEO: Vancouver Island mayor details emergency response after fatal bus crash

Sharie Minions says she is ‘appalled’ by condition of road where bus crashed

UVic president offers condolences after two students killed in bus crash

‘We also grieve with those closest to these members of our campus community,’ Cassels says

Coming Home: B.C. fire chief and disaster dog return from hurricane-ravaged Bahamas

The pair spent roughly one week on Great Abaco Island assisting in relief efforts

Newcomer Ferland lines up with sniper Pettersson as Vancouver Canucks camp opens

Ferland provides more depth and a scoring threat up front, Pettersson says

Intelligence official charged seemed to be ‘exemplar of discretion’: UBC professor

Professor Paul Evans says he served on Cameron Ortis’s doctoral dissertation committee

B.C. police watchdog to investigate man’s head injury during RCMP arrest

Suspect fled on a bicycle and fell off when an officer attempted to stop him

Nanaimo company gets licence to test psychedelic drugs for therapy treatment

Salvation Botanicals interested in manufacturing, testing and research and development

‘A real shame’: B.C. MLA says factors behind Tolko mill closing should have been caught

Kelowna-Mission MLA Steve Thomson said the industry is in bad shape across the province

VIDEO: Seniors at B.C. assisted living facility shocked by Oct. 1 eviction notice

Building owners terminate lease for McGuire Lake Congregate Living in Salmon Arm

Most Read