A team of pan-Canadian researched, led by UVic’s Roberta Hamme, will investigate the ocean’s role in slowing climate change as part of the federal government’s Advancing Climate Change Science in Canada initiative. (Kendra Crighton/News Staff)

Pan-Canadian research team led by UVic investigates ocean’s role in slowing climate change

University of Victoria receives $540,000 in federal funding

While researchers know the ocean plays a crucial role in absorbing large quantities of excess carbon dioxide released by human activities, they don’t quite know how fast the CO2 is being absorbed. This is leaving researchers with a bigger question — how will this change as the ocean warms and acidifies?

A team of pan-Canadian researchers, led by the University of Victoria, has received $540,000 in funding to address this critical gap in knowledge. As part of the federal government’s $4.7 million Advancing Climate Change Science in Canada initiative that was announced Thursday, the team will investigate the ocean’s role in slowing climate change.

READ ALSO: Climate change activists hosting ‘die-in’ in downtown Victoria

Roberta Hamme, a chemical oceanographer and associate professor in the School of Earth and Ocean Science, will lead the team and help Canada measure the absorption of carbon dioxide and predict future changes in all three of Canada’s oceans.

Bringing together university and government scientists, the team will also train students at seven universities across Canada to help develop the next generation of techniques that will be used to integrate observations from new ocean technologies and computer modelling efforts.

READ ALSO: Top 10 climate change myths debunked

“Science clearly shows us the causes of climate change, and our government is supporting the scientists that we know will show us the solutions,” said Minister of Environment and Climate Change Catherine McKenna in a statement. “Working with scientists and academics will help us keep pushing forward in the fight against climate change. By coming together and working collaboratively we can ensure a safer, more prosperous future for our children and grandchildren.”

For more information on ocean and climate research being done at UVic visit uvic.ca/campaign/ocean-climate/.



kendra.crighton@blackpress.ca

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