PHOTOS: Province releases never-before-seen photos of 1965 slide in Hope

The Hope Slide as depicted on a 1960s postcard. (The Hope Standard file)
The Hope Standard’s coverage of the Hope Slide which occurred on Jan. 9, 1965. (The Hope Standard file)
New road cut through the slide debris field (B.C. Ministry of Transportation/Flickr)
Looking west, toward Hope, at the runout of the slide area (B.C. Ministry of Transportation/Flickr)
Search and rescue workers on site of the Hope Slide, January 1965. (B.C. Ministry of Transportation/Flickr)
Phil Gaglardi and K9 dog at the slide site during search and recovery efforts, January 1965. (B.C. Ministry of Transportation/Flickr)
(B.C. Ministry of Transportation/Flickr)
Helicopter support arrives on site of the Hope Slide, January 1965. (B.C. Ministry of Transportation/Flickr)
RCMP using metal detector to assist with search and rescue efforts at the Hope Slide, January 1965. (B.C. Ministry of Transportation/Flickr)
Ministry staff drill rocks for clearing new roadway. (B.C. Ministry of Transportation/Flickr)
Aerial view of debris field from the slide, January 1965. (B.C. Ministry of Transportation/Flickr)
Minister of Highways, Phil Gaglardi on the site of the Hope Slide during recovery, January 1965. (B.C. Ministry of Transportation/Flickr)
Search and rescue workers on the site of the Hope Slide, January 1965. (B.C. Ministry of Transportation/Flickr)
Rescue workers trying to identify debris. (B.C. Ministry of Transportation/Flickr)
Search and rescue workers shovelling through debris field. (B.C. Ministry of Transportation/Flickr)

January 9 marks the 55th anniversary of the devastating Hope Slide on the Hope-Princeton Highway.

When the massive slide came down, it created a swath of destruction two miles long, scarring the landscape forever when it all came tumbling down at dawn.

“It was on January 9, 1965 that the southwest face of the mountain gave way, filling up the valley floor with rock and mud to a depth of 275 feet,” according to a story in the Chilliwack Progress on April 12, 1978, 13 years after the slide.

“More than 100 million tons of rock thundered down, obliterating Outram Lake and spilling water and mud up part of the opposite mountainside before settling back again.

READ MORE: The Hope Slide in history

“It is regarded as an event unequalled in the history of the province. The slide was apparently triggered by the second of two small earthquakes which it is recorded had epicentres in the Nicolum Valley.”

Four travellers were killed in the disaster and two of the bodies were never found, despite a huge search effort led by Search and Rescue volunteers.

The highway link was severed, and also telephone and power lines. But not for long. Temporary lines were installed within days, and a passable road was blitzed through the huge boulders in about a week.

The slide site was later described as resembling a barren, lunar landscape filled with rocks.

READ MORE: Obituary for one of the first on-scene at the Hope Slide


Do you have something to add to this story, or something else we should report on? Email:
jfeinberg@theprogress.com


@CHWKjourno
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