‘Please pray for our son,’ says mother of missing Manning Park hiker

Searchers continue efforts to find 25-year-old Vancouver man in Manning Park

Jordan Naterer, an electrical engineer from Vancouver, was last seen Saturday Oct. 10. Facebook photo.

Jordan Naterer, an electrical engineer from Vancouver, was last seen Saturday Oct. 10. Facebook photo.

“Please pray for my son.”

That is the plea from the mother of Jordan Naterer, who is missing in the mountains of Manning Park. She posted those words to her Facebook page Saturday morning, Oct. 17.

“We start today strong. The weather has given us a break and SAR is deploying every resource available to them. I have been told by the park management that missing persons are always found. No one has ever gone permanently missing, which gives us hope and comfort, knowing that we’ll have him back soon.”

Naterer’s parents, who live in Newfoundland, flew to B.C.’s interior earlier this week.

Naterer, an electrical engineer from Vancouver, was last seen Saturday Oct. 10.

He told friends he was headed for a solitary hike at Manning Park, and planned to stay in the bush overnight.

Those same friends became concerned when the 25-year-old failed to show up for a Thanksgiving dinner, Monday, Oct. 12.

Soon after, his vehicle was located at the Frosty Mountain trailhead by the Lightning Lake day use area of the park.

Related: Sister of missing hiker in Manning Park confident he will be found safe

Search and Rescue [SAR] groups from across the southern part of the province, including from Princeton and Hope, have been active in the effort to find Naterer.

According to Princeton RCMP Sgt. Rob Hughes, search efforts “ramped up” Thursday Oct. 15.

On Saturday Oct. 17, he said helicopters, ground searchers, and canine units were all in action.

Madelaine Geirc, a close friend of Naterer’s, told the Spotlight on Saturday that dozens of people who know the missing man are doing their best to help.

“There is a group of about 50 of us, friends and acquaintances, who are working together to help with the search. [That’s] in addition to the search and rescue teams, which we are all so, so, thankful for.

“Some are on-site and assisting at the base. Others are coordinating information, including speaking to potential leads, tracking weather patterns, searching for information on his gear, and analyzing topographic charts.”

Related: Search for missing Vancouver hiker in Manning Park intensifies

Geirc met Naterer when he moved from St. John’s to Vancouver two years ago, to complete his studies at UBC.

“He’s an absolutely decent guy: kind, smart, welcoming, giving, fully of energy, and really funny.”

Geirc added her friend is well-known for his bad puns.

Corinna Sawers is a manager at Manning Park. She said park staff is doing its best to support the searchers.

While the resort was fully booked at the time of the missing person’s alert, cabins were opened, and some accommodations juggled, to make as much room as possible for family, friends, and volunteers.

Search crew members are supplied with coffee and snacks, and meals have been provided at minimal cost.

A large hall and kitchen at the resort, normally used for wedding receptions, is open for those impacted by the situation. Within COVID-protocols, people can gather. It’s a space where baking is often dropped off by members of the public.

“There are so many volunteers up here and there are so many people,” she said.

“We have flyers up all over the resort and a lot of people are out hiking today. I am sure they are going to keep their eyes open.”

To report a typo, email:
publisher@similkameenspotlight.com
.



andrea.demeer@similkameenspotlight.com

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