David Suzuki, Corky Evan and Wally Oppal are all headed to the Cowichan Valley this week in advance of next week’s provincial election. (submitted)

David Suzuki, Corky Evan and Wally Oppal are all headed to the Cowichan Valley this week in advance of next week’s provincial election. (submitted)

Political parties bring big guns to battleground Cowichan Valley riding

David Suzuki and prominent politicians among notables coming to the Cowichan Valley

The Cowichan Valley will see a number of prominent visitors come to the area on May 3 as the provincial election draws close in this battleground riding.

Dr. David Suzuki will be at the Somena Longhouse, located at 5589 Club Road in Duncan, at 7 p.m.

The famous Canadian environmentalist is known for his television and radio series, documentaries and books about nature and the environment.

Suzuki will be joined by Green Party leader Andrew Weaver and Cowichan Valley Green candidate Sonia Furstenau to speak about shared connections to the land, each other and the challenges ahead for society.

The event is open to the public and free of charge.

Corky Evans, B.C.’s former Minister of Agriculture, Fish and Rural Development, was in Lake Cowichan on Tuesday and he will be in the Valley on May 3.

Evans, who served in several cabinet ministries when the NDP held power, ran twice for the leadership of B.C.’s NDP, placing second both times.

Evans and the Valley’s NDP candidate, Lori Iannidinardo, will be at the Cowichan Bay Pub at 1 p.m. to meet people from the agriculture, fish and food industries for a discussion about opportunities for the area’s producers.

Liberal powerhouse Wally Oppal is also visiting.

Oppal has served in the provincial cabinet as Attorney General and Minister Responsible for Multiculturalism.

He is also known as the author of a report: the Independent Commission of Inquiry into Policing in British Columbia, commonly referred to as the Oppal Inquiry.

Oppal and the Valley’s Liberal candidate Steve Housser will be at the village of Paldi, a former town in the region largely settled by East Indian settlers, at 4 p.m.

The provincial government has declared Paldi a provincial heritage site.