Several emergency vehicles responded to a fatal motor vehicle collision about 20 kilometres west of Salmon Arm. (Jim Elliot/Salmon Arm Observer)

Six deadly crashes on B.C. highways prompt police warning

Crashes in Chetwynd, Lytton, North Vancouver, the Shuswap, near Prince George and near Squamish

It was a deadly weekend on B.C. highways, as six people were killed in separate crashes.

The six fatal collisions spanned from Thursday to Monday, police said, and spared no part of B.C.

Chetwynd RCMP were called on Thursday after a man driving his F150 down Highway 29 went off the road, was ejected from his truck and died.

The next day, a woman died in Lytton after pulling out onto the highway right in front of another vehicle.

On Saturday, a man died after his vehicle veered into oncoming traffic in North Vancouver.

Sunday saw two killed in separate incidents after a Surrey woman crossed the centre line of the Sea-to-Sky highway north of Squamish, and a man driving a Ford pickup truck veered into the opposing lane on Highway 1 near Salmon Arm.

READ MORE: Family of Surrey woman killed in Sea-to-Sky crash wants to fulfil her dying wish

READ MORE: Man killed in Highway 1 crash west of Salmon Arm

The sixth crash took place just after midnight Monday when a pickup truck carrying three people crossed a centre line on Highway 97 south of Prince George, killing the driver.

“It’s a sad coincidence that we’ve had this cluster of crashes,” Cpl. Mike Halskov of the RCMP’s traffic division said.

The crashes were caused by simple mistake, he said, including the drivers who misjudged something and pulled out in front of another car.

Halskov couldn’t comment on what caused four of the drivers to veer into incoming traffic, but noted drugs and alcohol had not yet been ruled out for several of them.

He warned drivers to check the forecast at not only their starting point and destination, but along the way, too.

“As the weather changes as we get closer and closer to winter, we’re asking all drivers to be mindful of rapidly changing road conditions,” he said. “It might be sunny in the Lower Mainland, but snowing up north.”

Anyone heading out on a long drive should make sure their car is up for it.

Police recommend winter tires for inter-city drives, but tires rated for snow, with either a snowflake and mountain or “M+S” symbol, are legally required on most B.C. highways.

Halskov also warned drivers to make sure their brakes, coolant and wiper fluid were all in good order, as well as to defog their windows before heading out.

“If you’re not comfortable driving, stay home and find an alternate way to get to your destination,” he added.

The same applies for anyone imbibing with either alcohol or cannabis this holiday season.


@katslepian

katya.slepian@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Cowichan Valley jazz graduate wins prestigious scholarship

Bassist Brock Meades and drummer Graham Villette get $2,000 Fraser MacPherson Scholarship

Sarah Simpson Column: Getting antsy at the Duncan Days Parade

This story isn’t about bugs although there is totally a bug component.… Continue reading

Red Arrow Tigers stymied by Sox in pitchers’ duel

Parksville takes top spot in regular-season by a single point

Grass Court Classic kicks off tournament season

Grass Court Championship starts July 21

Duncan Grande Parade draws a crowd

Entries old and new enjoyed by a big audience

Canadian high school science courses behind on climate change, says UBC study

Researchers found performance on key areas varies by province and territory

Six inducted into BC Hockey Hall of Fame

The 26th ceremony in Penticton welcomed powerful figures both from on and off the ice

RCMP investigate two shootings in the Lower Mainland

Incidents happened in Surrey, with a victim being treated at Langley Memorial Hospital

CRA program to help poor file taxes yields noticeable bump in people helped

Extra money allows volunteer-driven clinics to operate year-round

Recall: Certain Pacific oysters may pose threat of paralytic shellfish poisoning

Consumers urged to either return affected packages or throw them out

How a Kamloops-born man helped put us on the moon

Jim Chamberlin did troubleshooting for the Apollo program, which led to its success

Sexual harassment complaints soaring amid ‘frat boy culture’ in Canada’s airline industry

‘It’s a #MeToo dumpster fire…and it’s exhausting for survivors’

Most Read