Terry and Peggy, pictures separately, both were surrendered to the BC SPCA Burnaby branch with infections. The pair were born with three-and-a-half legs. (BC SPCA handout)

Terry and Peggy, pictures separately, both were surrendered to the BC SPCA Burnaby branch with infections. The pair were born with three-and-a-half legs. (BC SPCA handout)

Terry and Peggy, kittens born with 3-and-a-half legs, surrendered to BC SPCA

The pair will have to undergo surgery to amputate the infected legs before being put up for adoption

Terry and Peggy, a pair of kittens with special needs, are two of the latest animals to land in the care of the BC SPCA and the animal welfare agency is asking for help from the public to get the cats on a road to recovery.

Terry and Peggy, both three months old, were born with three-and-a-half legs in an unplanned litter of kittens, the BC SPCA said in a news release. The owner surrendered them to the branch in Burnaby recently.

“Upon arrival to the shelter, it was apparent that the pair’s stumps had become raw and infected,” BC SPCA officials said in a statement Monday.

The kittens were administered antibiotics to fight infections and pain management, and will require leg amputations followed by their neuter and spay surgeries – costing an estimated $2,155.

“Both kittens are darling and they have not been slowed down at all by their handicap,” says SPCA Burnaby manager Nicole McBain. “They are full of beans and purr like any other kitten. These adorable kittens deserve to live a long life free of pain.”

The recovery time is an expected six weeks, and then the kittens will be put up for adoption.


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

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