Tofino plans to launch a pay-parking system around its public beaches, including this lot at Chesterman Beach. (Andrew Bailey photo)

Tofino plans to launch a pay-parking system around its public beaches, including this lot at Chesterman Beach. (Andrew Bailey photo)

Tofino set to charge for parking at public beaches

Fees will be charged at roughly 10 locations including Chesterman Beach

Tofino is preparing to introduce pay parking at its beaches this summer.

During a special meeting held last month, the town’s municipal council unanimously endorsed seeking out a third party to implement pay parking at about 10 local beach sites.

Hourly rates have not yet been hammered out, but will be similar to those in the Pacific Rim National Park Reserve. The Park Reserve’s day rates are: $10 for an adult, $8.40 for seniors and $20 for families or carpoolers.

Director of Infrastructure and Public Works Fraser Work said an annual pass will be implemented to provide discounts to locals and that residents of Tofino and neighbouring First Nations would receive a free pass in 2021, with an undetermined fee being introduced in 2022. Alberni Clayoquot Regional District residents living outside Tofino, including Ucluetians, will be charged $60 for an annual pass once the program is launched.

Anyone living outside the ACRD will be charged $120 for an annual pass.

Commercial vehicles, like surf schools, are expected to be charged between $300 – $600 for an annual beach parking permit.

Work added that all groups are expected to be restricted to a maximum of four hours to increase turnover and allow people circulating the block to eventually get to the beach.

“We have to draw a line in the sand somewhere,” Coun. Britt Chalmers said. “We’ve tried to distinguish between the maximum privilege in the first year going to Tofino residents and the First Nations communities with a very inexpensive but reasonable cost for ACRD (residents), which would potentially access our facilities at a much higher frequency than others on the Island.”

He explained the need to charge for parking arised from high demand and limited supply, abuse of current parking laws, traffic safety impacts and wear and tear on infrastructure, adding that a tighter configuration would maximize the space currently allocated for parking.

“There’s a set of parking problems that we’re trying to solve…We, of course, have a very high demand for a limited supply of parking. We also suffer from an inefficient use of available space in many areas, especially at the beaches,” he said.

Mayor Dan Law expressed concern about capping beach visits for locals to four hours.

“I’d really hate to see a resident stay for five hours and get a parking ticket for it,” he said.

For more news from Vancouver Island and beyond delivered daily into your inbox, please click here.

RELATED: Bonfires out, but machine-powered beach fires still OK in Tofino

RELATED: Tourism Tofino says visitors generate $240 million annually

beachesmunicipal politicsparkingTofino,

Just Posted

FILE – Perry Bellegarde, National Chief of the Assembly of First Nations, takes part in an event on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Tuesday, July 7, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Indigenous Peoples Day must be a ‘call to action’, says Assembly of First Nations chief

Discovery of children at Kamloops residential school site must lead to change, Perry Bellegarde says

Robert’s column
Robert Barron column: Looking forward to 39 Days of Summer

I have always been a big fan of live music.

Cowichan seniors have a new resource. (submitted)
Free Cowichan Seniors program offers social prescriptions

Seniors 60 and over who are at higher risk of frailty due… Continue reading

Cowichan District Hospital. (File photo)
Guest column: The story of a surgery in Cowichan

In homage to the Cowichan District Hospital and its surgical team

Motorcyclists in the hundreds depart from Duncan on a South Island ride in honour of the Kamloops 215. (Kevin Rothbauer/Citizen)
Ride for the Kamloops 215 takes over Trans-Canada Highway

“My family was in residential schools for three generations. On the day… Continue reading

Marco Mendicino, Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship during a press conference in Ottawa on Thursday, May 13, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Canada to welcome 45,000 refugees this year, says immigration minister

Canada plans to increase persons admitted from 23,500 to 45,000 and expedite permanent residency applications

The Sacred Hearts church on PIB land burned Monday morning. (Theresa May Jack/Facebook)
Two churches on First Nation land in South Okanagan burn to the ground

Sacred Hearts church on Penticton Indian Band land was reduced to rubble

Tl’etinqox-lead ceremony at the site of the former St. Joseph’s Mission in Williams Lake, B.C., June 18, 2021. (Angie Mindus photo - Williams Lake Tribune)
‘We are all one people’: Honouring residential school victims and survivors

Love, support and curiousity: Canadians urged to learn about residential schools and their impact

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Indigenous rights and climate activists gathered outside Liberty Mutual’s office in Vancouver to pressure the insurance giant to stop covering Trans Mountain. (Photo by Andrew Larigakis)
Activists work to ensure Trans Mountain won’t get insurance

Global campaign urging insurance providers to stay away from Canadian pipeline project

In the first election with public money replacing corporate or union donations, B.C. Liberal leader Andrew Wilkinson, B.C. Greens leader Sonia Furstenau and B.C. NDP leader John Horgan take part in election debate at the University of B.C., Oct. 13, 2020. (THE CANADIAN PRESS)
B.C. MLAs ponder 2022 ‘sunset’ of subsidy for political parties

NDP, B.C. Fed call for increase, B.C. Liberals have no comment

Investigators use a bucket to help recover human remains at a home burned in the Camp fire, Thursday, Nov. 15, 2018, in Magalia, Calif. Many of the missing in the deadly Northern California wildfire are elderly residents in Magalia, a forested town of about 11,000 north of the destroyed town of Paradise. (AP Photo/John Locher)
‘Forever War’ with fire has California battling forests instead

Five of the state’s largest-ever blazes seared California last year, as authorities tackle prevention

Tokyo 2020 President Seiko Hashimoto and IOC President Thomas Bach, on a screen, speak during a five=party online meeting at Harumi Island Triton Square Tower Y in Tokyo Monday, June 21, 2021. The Tokyo Olympics will allow some local fans to attend when the games open in just over a month, Tokyo organizing committee officials and the IOC said on Monday. (Rodrigo Reyes Marin/Pool Photo via AP)
Tokyo Olympics to allow Japanese fans only, with strict limits

Organizers set a limit of 50% capacity — up to a maximum of 10,000 fans

Most Read