Family’s tragedy shouldn’t be public

People came out to help because they cared about the Kilmer family

Family’s tragedy shouldn’t be public

What have we come to that a government agency can decide whether the details of a family’s tragedy can be shared with the public or not?

To state that the desire of the public and the media to know the details of Ben Kilmer’s death outweighs the family’s privacy is obscene. The chief coroner’s claim that because there were public appeals to help find Ben means that those helping should be entitled to the details of his death is so wrong. The knowledge that the poor man took his own life is more than enough information for those that searched for Ben and for the public.

People came out to help because they cared about the Kilmer family, whether they knew them or not. I do not know the Kilmer family and their grief is their own.

Bruce Stevens

Shawnigan Lake

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