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Letter: Bee careful…

Without insects our crops dry up, the birds go hungry and so will humans.

Bee careful…

Winged or wriggling, where are they? Our garden is full of scented flowers this April — Oregon grape, laurel, osmanthus, daffodils, red currant — thanks to the wonderful gift of this Cowichan Valley climate. Last year the small creatures were enjoying the bounty. However in the last two weeks we may have counted eight wild bees, and a handful of other flies. These are the pollinators that produce our berry, fruit and seed crops. Some local specialists have been warning of insect demise. The honey bee is so sensitive to its environment that it can do a dance to accurately direct fellow bees to sources of pollen and nectar. What have these tiny creatures picked up that has removed them from our area at this time?

Without insects our crops dry up, the birds go hungry and so will humans.

Insect destroyers include loss of habitat, 24-hour light, herbi- pesti- and fungicides. Are there factors more subtle than these that the small creatures can notice? Humans have means to pick up the messages too. Are we watching, listening and acting for all living creatures or not?

I miss my pollinator friends and am waiting for their return.

Tanis Bapty

North Cowichan

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