letters

Letter: Distinction between old growth and ancient forest

Perhaps D. Moldowin meant to say “12 of our lifetimes”

Distinction between old growth and ancient forest

Letter writer D. Moldowin makes the following statement: “To be clear: ancient trees that have taken 120 of our lifetimes to grow are currently being cut down every day at an astounding rate.”

This certainly sounds alarming! Except that 120 times a lifetime of 80 years would make these trees 9,600 years old. This is roughly 10 times the age of the oldest trees on Vancouver Island, so perhaps D. Moldowin meant to say “12 of our lifetimes”. But that, too, would assume the oldest possible age of the trees; B.C. defines old growth on the coast as being 250 or older.

Unfortunately, there seems to be little distinction made between old growth forest and ancient forest. Several of the trees in question are remarkable and ancient, though perhaps not quite as old as the enormous Port Renfrew area Red Creek Fir which is thought to be about 1,000 years old. Ancient and rare trees should be legally protected, and that involves areas of protection, not just the individual trees left exposed to the winds.

Edward Field

Maple Bay

Letters