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Letter: Restoring cross not destructive

The cross may be unwanted by some, but its defence is neither destructive nor inappropriate

Restoring cross not destructive

The saga of the cross atop Mount Tzouhalem continues. Some people feel the issue is unimportant, but they could not be more wrong. The volume of letters submitted to the Citizen about the issue, myself and others defending the cross, while others oppose it, shows that it continues to be important.

A major concern about all of this is the way in which elements of the issue are being ignored or downplayed. First, destroying, removing or damaging the cross is an act of vandalism. It is not an act of creation or restoration, and it is remarkable that some people will not admit this or skirt around it, implying that it is somehow acceptable or a justifiable act. Destruction is destruction. In contrast, restoring the cross or, as I have explained in previous letters, erecting it in the first place is not destructive, however much you might disagree with it.

The cross may be unwanted by some, but its defence is neither destructive nor inappropriate. Let’s establish that. Citizens have the right to defend its existence. Also, as Canadians living in the Cowichan Valley, this issue has broad implications for everyone. In theory we are living in a democracy based on the rule of law. These days, however, the rule of law is sometimes less defended than mob action and, long term, that is unacceptable.

If mobs or individuals can tear down statues or destroy public monuments, as they have successfully managed to do across Canada, creating the political change they want through violence, while intimidating public officials or administrators into changing policy, then the rule of law is at risk and our way of life is as well. Like the rest of the western world, Canada is in the throes of a cultural struggle. Let’s make the right decision here in the Cowichan Valley. The rule of law should prevail, not the power of destructive acts.

Perry Foster

Duncan

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