Look at household dust for air quality

In Wednesday’s paper, Shirley Crosson of the Cowichan Fresh Air Team is asking for more monitoring of the outdoor air quality.

In Wednesday’s paper, Shirley Crosson of the Cowichan Fresh Air Team is asking for more monitoring of the outdoor air quality.

Has anyone followed up on the release of a report about household dust and the chemicals it collects from common goods?

It was found that up to 90 per cent of the dust samples contain harmful chemicals. There are 45 chemicals in five classes that are in common consumer goods such as furniture, flooring, baby products, cleaning supplies and food packaging, for example.

Some of these chemicals cause respiratory problems and affects the IQ of children. As they are the ones that are more likely to be crawling around on the floor, they would have more exposure to the dust.

The report lists the chemicals they found and what health problems they cause. Please take the time to read the articles on this and maybe you will learn something.

Maybe Dr. Hasselback could brush up on this study also.

The lead author is Ami Zota of the Milken Institute School of Public Health at George Washington University.

 

Ed Aiken

Cobble Hill

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