Moratorium on development a terrible idea

What is the end goal of this motion?

Moratorium on development a terrible idea

I am writing to you in hopes that recent motions brought forward to stymie urban development in the Cowichan Valley are given adequate consideration before implementation.

In regards to the motion to implement a moratorium on all urban growth, what is the end goal of this motion?

Does council not understand the immense negative ramifications that would come from imposing a cease and desist order on all new construction?

Is it council’s intention to drive up the cost of housing even further, while prices are already out of reach for most buyers?

Where does council intend to replace the lost income that would come from seeing new construction projects from design to the end user?

What in council’s mind is the benefit to be gained by such a one track motion?

How long does council intend to keep this moratorium on new construction in place?

When there are no new projects being added to rejuvenate the taxes collected, will council be cutting their own salaries to match the level of newly created unemployment in the Valley?

Why, at a time when taxes are already at some of the highest levels ever, would council consider a motion of this magnitude and risk putting all residents, business owners and visitors in the Valley at risk of being on the hook for the avalanche of litigation that will surely follow if such a motion is passed?

Will council be opening these motions up for honest discussions with the public and private sectors before voting on them?

Is it not council’s duty to represent the interests of ALL Cowichan Valley citizens and not just a select few?

The families and businesses that live in and support the Cowichan Valley need to know that their voices are heard and that decisions made by council are not done without proper consultation and have the best interests of all parties affected in mind. The prospect of seeing more businesses closed, more people out of work and unable to support their families and companies being forced to take their business elsewhere is not something I care to see in the future.

Please ensure proper consultation is achieved prior to seeing this through.

Keith Tennert

Ladysmith

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