Shawnigan air; it’s different here

One has to read the article to understand that there are too many grey areas in these statements to actually make a change.

Re: Clean air advocates

One has to read the article to understand that there are too many grey areas in these statements to actually make a change.

Some “areas” are different — yes — so a blanket bylaw would not be appropriate. The link below can be used to help make some decisions, but again, which areas need to be looked at?

http://sciencenordic.com/no-serious-harm-breathing-wood-smoke

The Valley ends at Cobble Hill Road.

When the electricity goes off, do you drive somewhere, so as to be able to eat? Do you need to flush but can’t? Do you get cold rather quickly? Will your pipes in your home freeze, etc.?

Two solutions are to break out the generator, (to get your well pump going) and get the woodstove going to make your food and keep you pipes from bursting.

Driving around just pollutes as well — the exhaust however, has no smell and is invisible, therefore it gets little or no attention paid to it!

This particular article, “Clean air advocates call for law changes”, does not take into account the program to change out old wood heating stoves.

It suggests that there is smoke all year long in the valley, I would ask, from where, as I drive through it and have noted a large number of clear days (we are talking woodsmoke here).

Comparing the Valley to Beijing, is absurd.

The other side of this is, are the “advocates” willing to pay for the parallelling of BC Hydro submarine lines from the Mainland? are they willing to pay for the extra cost a lot of us would have to pay for the rising costs of electricity if they were to actually succeed in their endeavours? In both cases I think not.

Another reason for Shawnigan Lake (Area B) to leave the CVRD. North Cowichan can have their rules and regs.

It’s different here.

 

David Richards

Shawnigan