Cobble Hill’s Price sprints to first Dirt Cup championship

Robbie Price’s first win on the Lucas Oil American Sprint Car Series was a huge one.

The 21-year-old driver from Cobble Hill beat out the rest of the field to take the $15,000 paycheque in the 48th annual Jim Raper Memorial Dirt Cup at Washington’s Skagit Speedway on Saturday.

“It’s the crown jewel of the Northwest,” Price commented on Monday. “It was a really good weekend.

“It’s the best one of my career, the biggest one I’ve ever won. It will forever be one of my favourites.”

Price has raced in the Dirt Cup since he started driving sprint cars in 2014. On Saturday, he became the youngest winner in the history of the event.

A three-day event, the Dirt Cup begins with two nights of races in which drivers accumulate points to determine where they line up for the final race on Saturday. Price drove well enough on the first two nights to start fourth on Saturday.

“It was good,” Price stated. “I had a really good first two nights. I drove smart; I knew it was all leading up to Saturday. I was thinking long-term.”

Price’s No. 21P car, sponsored by the Cowichan Valley’s own Millstone Heating and Sheetmetal, was in the top three or four cars for most of the race on Saturday before taking the lead for laps 22-26. After dropping back for a bit, he regained the lead on lap 31 and held it for the rest of the race as the other contenders fell behind a lapped car.

“It was a really good race,” Price said. “I got to battle with a couple cars. I had to work for it. I was ecstatic to be in a position to win. Just to win was an honour.”

Born and raised in Cobble Hill, Price spends most of the year travelling around the U.S. for races, returning to Vancouver Island for just a month or two.

“I still say it’s home though,” he said.

Price is a third-generation driver, following in the footsteps of his father and grandfather. He got his own start at the age of eight, racing quarter midgets in Langley, and made the step to sprint cars in 2014. A “basic” type of race car, sprint cars are a mere 1,400 pounds, and the class Price currently competes in uses a 360-cubic inch engine with 750 horsepower. The “best of the best” drive in the 410-cubic inch class, which is where Price wants to end up.

“One day I’d like to race those full-time,” he said.

The Lucas Oil American Sprint Car Series kicked off in Las Vegas this February, with stops across much of the U.S., from Washington and California to Pennsylvania before the last race in Texas in November. It keeps Price busy, but he wouldn’t want to be doing anything else.

“It’s a great experience,” he said. “It’s a good lifestyle. I like it.”

Just Posted

North Cowichan/Duncan RCMP reports climb in calls for service

4.6 per cent increase over same time last year

Cowichan Crime Stoppers Most Wanted

Do you know where these individuals are?

Island exports focus of keynote at Economic Summit in Nanaimo

Peter Hall, vice president and chief economist with (EDC) is one of four keynote speakers

VIDEO Stone Poets just folk enough, just contemporary enough to cover a lot of ground

You’ll enjoy relaxing to the sounds of these three talented musical storytellers

VIDEO: Reports say Lashana Lynch is the new 007

Daniel Craig will reprise his role as Bond one last time

Nine kittens and cats rescued after being locked in bins in northern B.C.: SPCA

SPCA says cats were starving, and matted with feces and urine

High-speed rail link would run from Vancouver to Seattle in under 1 hour: study

Annual ridership is projected to exceed three million

ICBC insurance renewals get more complicated this year

Crash history, driver risk prompt more reporting requirements

B.C. man dies from rabies after contact with Vancouver Island bat

Last known case of human rabies in B.C. was 16 years ago

U.S. tug firm to be sentenced for 2016 spill in B.C. First Nation’s territory

The Nathan E. Stewart spilled 110,000 litres of diesel and heavy oils in October 2016

Asylum figures show overall slower rate of irregular crossings into Canada

Between January and June 2019, a total of 6,707 asylum seekers crossed irregularly into Canada

Wolves not gnawing into Island’s prey population

Forestry practices, not predation, blamed for reduced numbers in prey animals

Youth seen with gun at Nanaimo mall, suspect now in custody

Woodgrove Centre shut down during police incident

Most Read