Roller derby athletes skate in the most recent Nanaimo Pride Parade in 2019. (News Bulletin file photo)

Roller derby athletes skate in the most recent Nanaimo Pride Parade in 2019. (News Bulletin file photo)

Task force shares ideas to help Canadian sports associations be more LGBTQ-inclusive

Canada’s Sport Inclusion Task Force launches website during Pride Month

A group tasked with making sports safer and more welcoming for members of the LGBTQ community has compiled information and resources in time for Pride Month.

Canada’s Sport Inclusion Task Force, steered by the Canadian Olympic Committee, Canadian Women and Sport and several other partners, launched a new website, www.sportinclusion.ca, on Wednesday, June 2.

According to a press release, the website is meant as a hub for resources to support sports teams and associations in prioritizing equity, diversity and inclusion for LGBTQ people. David Shoemaker, Canadian Olympic Committee CEO, said in the release that the centralized website will go a long way to supporting sports organizations continue to make progress on those fronts.

“Making sport truly inclusive and accessible for all takes education, resources, expertise and concerted effort from all levels in the system, ” he said.

The release says the task force’s core objectives are to create awareness about the importance of LGBTQ inclusion, help sports organizations build capacity and commitment to welcome those who are LGBTQ, help guide meaningful action, and ultimately make Canadian sports safer and more welcoming for LGBTQ individuals.

Allison Sandmeyer-Graves, Canadian Women and Sport CEO, said in the release that the new website will help all levels of sports organizations take tangible steps.

“Sport that is inclusive of LGBTQI2S+ people is sport that is safer and welcoming for all individuals,” she said. “We encourage all sport leaders to visit this website and make full use of the resources and tools offered.”

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EDITORIAL: We can make progress during Pride Month

READ ALSO: Study finds Canada a ‘laggard’ on homophobia in sports



editor@nanaimobulletin.com

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