Emergency Preparedness

CVRD extends local state of emergency after last week’s flooding to Nov. 29 as flood support efforts continue in heavily impacted areas. Pictured is Russell Farm Market at the height of the flooding. (File photo)

Cowichan Valley Regional District extends local state of emergency to Nov. 29

Flood support efforts continue in heavily impacted areas

  • Nov 22, 2021

 

A vehicle is submerged in flood waters along a road in Abbotsford, B.C., Monday, Nov. 15, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Experts say B.C. rainstorms highlight increasing flood risks and need to prepare

Insurers say flood damage is already by far the most expensive type of extreme weather risk

 

Sarah De Francesco, left, Albert Huynh, right, and Leanne Opuyes, back left, cool off in the frigid Lynn Creek water in North Vancouver, B.C., on Monday, June 28, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

B.C.’s inadequate heat wave supports heightened risks to vulnerable people: report

B.C. reported 569 “heat-related deaths” in the province from June 20 to July 29

 

Flooding is one of the issues being addressed by the emergency management plan. The Cowichan Valley Regional District is exploring ways to better prepare for major emergencies. (Kevin Rothbauer/Citizen)

CVRD looks to fill emergency management program gaps

The Cowichan Valley Regional District is exploring ways to better prepare for…

Flooding is one of the issues being addressed by the emergency management plan. The Cowichan Valley Regional District is exploring ways to better prepare for major emergencies. (Kevin Rothbauer/Citizen)
Emergency kit items. (Stock photo)

Majority of British Columbians have poor emergency preparedness: poll

Less than 25 per cent of British Columbians have an emergency kit and plan

Emergency kit items. (Stock photo)
Local governments and First Nations in the Cowichan Valley have received $200,000 from the province to enhance communications during emergencies, like the windstorm (pictured) that hit the region in 2018. (File photo)

Cowichan region receives $200,000 for emergency operations centres

Provincial funding to pay for emergency communications improvements

  • Jul 13, 2021
Local governments and First Nations in the Cowichan Valley have received $200,000 from the province to enhance communications during emergencies, like the windstorm (pictured) that hit the region in 2018. (File photo)
(Black Press Media)

Emergency alert test an ‘accidental re-broadcast’ of last week’s, B.C. says

Province says alert was sent out due to human error

(Black Press Media)
The Cowichan Valley Regional District has applied for a $199,000 grant to upgrade its emergency communication systems that are used during such events as the major windstorm that hit the Valley in 2018 (pictured).

CVRD looks to upgrade emergency communications with grant

Staff say communications issues plague emergency response efforts in area

The Cowichan Valley Regional District has applied for a $199,000 grant to upgrade its emergency communication systems that are used during such events as the major windstorm that hit the Valley in 2018 (pictured).
Offices, schools, homes and more offer protection in the event of an earthquake. The Great BC ShakeOut is slated for Oct. 15, but individuals and socially distanced groups can practice earthquake drills anytime. (Black Press media file photo)

Great BC ShakeOut takes a COVID-safe approach for 2020

Public encouraged to host socially distanced earthquake drills Oct. 15 or anytime

Offices, schools, homes and more offer protection in the event of an earthquake. The Great BC ShakeOut is slated for Oct. 15, but individuals and socially distanced groups can practice earthquake drills anytime. (Black Press media file photo)
People in Lake Cowichan and the surrounding communities lost power for some time after a major windstorm in 2018 swept through the region, causing trees to fall on power lines. (File photo)

Town of Lake Cowichan adopts new emergency plan

Plan in the works since the windstorm in 2018

People in Lake Cowichan and the surrounding communities lost power for some time after a major windstorm in 2018 swept through the region, causing trees to fall on power lines. (File photo)
A four-year-old child was injured after falling out of a window in Surrey in September 2019 – one of 14 high-fall incidents in B.C. that year. (Shane MacKichan photos)

Child, 3, falls from window in Burnaby, sparking warning from BC Children’s Hospital

Fasten windows and lock balconies are just a few of the suggested safety measures

A four-year-old child was injured after falling out of a window in Surrey in September 2019 – one of 14 high-fall incidents in B.C. that year. (Shane MacKichan photos)
The U.S. Geological Survey is reporting an earthquake the afternoon of Jan. 24, 2020 was a 4.8 magnitude and 26 kilometres deep. (USGS MAP)

4.8 earthquake shakes Vancouver Island’s west coast

No tsunami expected at this time

The U.S. Geological Survey is reporting an earthquake the afternoon of Jan. 24, 2020 was a 4.8 magnitude and 26 kilometres deep. (USGS MAP)