history

”The fully engulfed structure fire at Mountain Man Services on South Shore Road in Lake Cowichan that the fire department arrived to on Thursday, Nov. 15. Top right: LCFD fight the blaze for over two hours and are seen here on the roof extinguishing a hot spot. Below right: Denis Pilon, Mountain Man Services owner, surveys the remains of his workshop on Friday morning after talking with Lake Cowichan RCMP.” (Lake Cowichan Gazette, Nov. 21, 2012)

Flashback: Garbage drama, more RCMP appointed, school board saga continues

A look back at the history of the Cowichan Lake area

 

“Low hanging clouds offered up moments of rain and snow flurries for the assembled crowd along the parade route and at the cenotaph on Sunday, Nov. 11 for the Remembrance Day ceremony in Lake Cowichan. The weather didn’t dampen the enthusiasm and spirit of the estimated 150 plus crowd as lake area residents paid their respects for veterans everywhere as well as their own local heroes. Carol Martel, Janet Tipton, and John Trottier pose with their brother Sergeant Major Gerald Trottier at the Lake Cowichan Remembrance Day ceremony. Gerald grew up in Lake Cowichan and is now stationed in Winnipeg. Gerald placed a wreath at the cenotaph in honour of his twin brother Tom who died in Cyprus while on peace keeping duty April 25, 1988. Gerald has served 600 days in Afghanistan.” (Lake Cowichan Gazette, Nov. 14, 2012)

Flashback: Deadly flying rocks, school trustee campaign battles, islands for sale

A look back at the history of the Cowichan Lake area

 

Victor Earl Ordano’s headstone at the Chemainus Cemetery. (Photo by Mike Russell)

No Stone Left Alone links family’s history to Penelakut

Close connection found from a friend in teacher’s research

  • Nov 10, 2022
Victor Earl Ordano’s headstone at the Chemainus Cemetery. (Photo by Mike Russell)
Cassandra Hatton, senior vice president, global head of department, Science & Popular Culture at Sotheby’s, touches the tooth of a Tyrannosaurus rex skull excavated from Harding County, South Dakota, in 2020-2021, in New York City on Friday, Nov. 4, 2022. When auctioned in December, the auction house expects the dinosaur skull to sell for $15 to $25 million. (AP Photo/Ted Shaffrey)
Cassandra Hatton, senior vice president, global head of department, Science & Popular Culture at Sotheby’s, touches the tooth of a Tyrannosaurus rex skull excavated from Harding County, South Dakota, in 2020-2021, in New York City on Friday, Nov. 4, 2022. When auctioned in December, the auction house expects the dinosaur skull to sell for $15 to $25 million. (AP Photo/Ted Shaffrey)
“Legion member Lola Sinclair was busy selling poppies around Lake Cowichan last week. Here she helps Lois Atchison purchase her poppy in honour of Remembrance Day. The mission of The Royal Canadian Legion is ‘to serve veterans and their dependents, to promote Remembrance, and to act in the service of Canada and its communities.’ The major source of funding for the Legion to accomplish this work is the annual Poppy Campaign, the foundation of the Remembrance Program. It is the generosity of Canadians through this program that enables the Legion to ensure that veterans and their dependents are cared for and treated with the respect they deserve. Since 1921, the Poppy has stood as a symbol of Remembrance and now every November, Poppies blossom on the lapels and collars of over half of Canada’s entire population.” (Lake Cowichan Gazette, Nov. 7, 2012)

Flashback: Halloween, winter road conditions and your tax dollars at work

A look back at the history of the Cowichan Lake area

“Legion member Lola Sinclair was busy selling poppies around Lake Cowichan last week. Here she helps Lois Atchison purchase her poppy in honour of Remembrance Day. The mission of The Royal Canadian Legion is ‘to serve veterans and their dependents, to promote Remembrance, and to act in the service of Canada and its communities.’ The major source of funding for the Legion to accomplish this work is the annual Poppy Campaign, the foundation of the Remembrance Program. It is the generosity of Canadians through this program that enables the Legion to ensure that veterans and their dependents are cared for and treated with the respect they deserve. Since 1921, the Poppy has stood as a symbol of Remembrance and now every November, Poppies blossom on the lapels and collars of over half of Canada’s entire population.” (Lake Cowichan Gazette, Nov. 7, 2012)
Robert Friedman plays a Steinway grand piano once owned by Thomas Edison, with possible bite marks from the inventor visible, on Sept. 28, 2022, in Woodstock, N.Y. Edison, who was hard of hearing, bit into phonographs and pianos to help him better experience music. Friedman purchased the piano last year and hopes to find a home for it where it can be seen by the public. (AP Photo/Michael Hill)

VIDEO: Thomas Edison may have left his mark on piano

Famed inventor left ‘toothy signatures’ on piano

Robert Friedman plays a Steinway grand piano once owned by Thomas Edison, with possible bite marks from the inventor visible, on Sept. 28, 2022, in Woodstock, N.Y. Edison, who was hard of hearing, bit into phonographs and pianos to help him better experience music. Friedman purchased the piano last year and hopes to find a home for it where it can be seen by the public. (AP Photo/Michael Hill)
After some cloak-and-dagger proceedings, the province of British Columbia puchased Canada’s first two submarines, CC1 (on the left) and CC2, as added protection for its coastal cities of Vancouver and Victoria at the start of the Great War. (Library and Archives Canada photo)

Special First World War exhibit at museum in Duncan

World War I: Remembering What We Lost and What We Achieved

  • Oct 31, 2022
After some cloak-and-dagger proceedings, the province of British Columbia puchased Canada’s first two submarines, CC1 (on the left) and CC2, as added protection for its coastal cities of Vancouver and Victoria at the start of the Great War. (Library and Archives Canada photo)
A person poses for a photo in front a large replica of National Geographic’s Sept. 2010 magazine cover at the Beyond King Tut Immersive Experience, Thursday, Oct. 27, 2022, in New York. The exhibition will open to the public on Friday, in commemoration of the the 100th anniversary of the discovery of King Tut’s tomb on Nov. 4, 1922. (AP Photo/Julia Nikhinson)

King Tut and his treasures to come alive for a high-def age in Vancouver

B.C. among the stops planned for immersive digital display of the Egyptian boy king

A person poses for a photo in front a large replica of National Geographic’s Sept. 2010 magazine cover at the Beyond King Tut Immersive Experience, Thursday, Oct. 27, 2022, in New York. The exhibition will open to the public on Friday, in commemoration of the the 100th anniversary of the discovery of King Tut’s tomb on Nov. 4, 1922. (AP Photo/Julia Nikhinson)
“Mariah Segee waits as Con. Jim Preston engraves her name in her bike at the Lake Cowichan Fire Department’s bike rally on Oct. 13. Approximately 12 kids participated in the event, with younger kids learning skills and older kids participating in a race through Friendship Park behind Palsson Elementary.” (Lake Cowichan Gazette, Oct. 17, 2012)

Flashback: Paving, byelection, drugs and booze, and one lucky dog

A look back at the history of the Cowichan Lake area

“Mariah Segee waits as Con. Jim Preston engraves her name in her bike at the Lake Cowichan Fire Department’s bike rally on Oct. 13. Approximately 12 kids participated in the event, with younger kids learning skills and older kids participating in a race through Friendship Park behind Palsson Elementary.” (Lake Cowichan Gazette, Oct. 17, 2012)
“Frazer Willmott concentrates as he prepares a fish in order to make a print at the first annual Cowichan Valley Rivers Day on Sept. 30, at Stoltz Pool. Activities like this for kids were just one aspect of the two day event.” (Lake Cowichan Gazette, Oct. 3, 2012)

Flashback: Rivers Day, a forestry lull, a tiny turnout and rubber stamps

A look back at the history of the Cowichan Lake area

“Frazer Willmott concentrates as he prepares a fish in order to make a print at the first annual Cowichan Valley Rivers Day on Sept. 30, at Stoltz Pool. Activities like this for kids were just one aspect of the two day event.” (Lake Cowichan Gazette, Oct. 3, 2012)
This picture of a gathering of Paldi residents was taken in 1936. (Cowichan Valley Museum and Archives)

Cowichan’s historic community of Paldi to be subject of new Heritage Minute

Town considered to be one of Canada’s first multicultural communities

This picture of a gathering of Paldi residents was taken in 1936. (Cowichan Valley Museum and Archives)
“Doug Liske (centre) decides to add a new aspect to the idea of shaving one’s head for cancer research by dying his hair blue and pink on Sept. 23, outside Country Grocer. Here, he stands with the finished product with (from left) Wanda Weirsma, Amanda Sawatzky, Jannina Russell, and Laurie Johnson, all volunteers who helped him raise cash for the Tour de Rock cause by selling hot dogs this past Sunday.” (Lake Cowichan Gazette/Sept. 26, 2012)
“Doug Liske (centre) decides to add a new aspect to the idea of shaving one’s head for cancer research by dying his hair blue and pink on Sept. 23, outside Country Grocer. Here, he stands with the finished product with (from left) Wanda Weirsma, Amanda Sawatzky, Jannina Russell, and Laurie Johnson, all volunteers who helped him raise cash for the Tour de Rock cause by selling hot dogs this past Sunday.” (Lake Cowichan Gazette/Sept. 26, 2012)
”From left: Chloe Bergman, Lauren Nelson, and Jerry Edson were fire chief for a day on Oct. 15, after having correctly answered all fi re safety questions and colouring their ‘I will Learn not to Burn’ posters given to Palsson Elementary School students by the Lake Cowichan Volunteer Fire Department. The kids got a tour of the fire department building, received a bag of goodies including a flashlight, stickers, a t-shirt, and safety pamphlet, and were treated to Tim Hortons treats.” (Lake Cowichan Gazette, Oct. 24, 2012)

Flashback: Christmas hampers, foreshore leases, and a sign of the times

A look back at the history of the Cowichan Lake area

”From left: Chloe Bergman, Lauren Nelson, and Jerry Edson were fire chief for a day on Oct. 15, after having correctly answered all fi re safety questions and colouring their ‘I will Learn not to Burn’ posters given to Palsson Elementary School students by the Lake Cowichan Volunteer Fire Department. The kids got a tour of the fire department building, received a bag of goodies including a flashlight, stickers, a t-shirt, and safety pamphlet, and were treated to Tim Hortons treats.” (Lake Cowichan Gazette, Oct. 24, 2012)
“A vehicle involved in an accident along the 9000 block of the Youbou Highway is pictured here engulfed in flames. Three occupants were in the vehicle at the time of the crash. One was ejected out of the vehicle, it is not known how the other two got out.” (Lake Cowichan Gazette, Oct. 10, 2012)

Flashback: Fiery crash, arena floor costs, pay TV possibilities

A look back at the history of the Cowichan Lake area

“A vehicle involved in an accident along the 9000 block of the Youbou Highway is pictured here engulfed in flames. Three occupants were in the vehicle at the time of the crash. One was ejected out of the vehicle, it is not known how the other two got out.” (Lake Cowichan Gazette, Oct. 10, 2012)
”It was reportedly inaccessible but Stewart Mossman’s log salvaging equipment went where no man would go — nearly 300 feet down into Lake Cowichan to salvage the Republican Sea Bee Float Plane which crashed into Lake Cowichan and sank on Sept. 27. Sole occupant and pilot was rescued from the plane before it sank and it had been determined to leave the plane in its resting place as most divers are only licensed to go to a 150 foot depth. But, with the aid of a sonar, Mossman located the plane and was able to raise it. Mossman will salvage what he can for his own costs.” (Lake News, Sept. 24, 1997)

Flashback: New dock, speeding, back to work and village expansion

A look back at the history of the Cowichan Lake area

”It was reportedly inaccessible but Stewart Mossman’s log salvaging equipment went where no man would go — nearly 300 feet down into Lake Cowichan to salvage the Republican Sea Bee Float Plane which crashed into Lake Cowichan and sank on Sept. 27. Sole occupant and pilot was rescued from the plane before it sank and it had been determined to leave the plane in its resting place as most divers are only licensed to go to a 150 foot depth. But, with the aid of a sonar, Mossman located the plane and was able to raise it. Mossman will salvage what he can for his own costs.” (Lake News, Sept. 24, 1997)
”Runners, walkers, bikers, and even kids in strollers head out from the start line at Saywell Park for this year’s Terry Fox Run on Sunday, Sept. 9, to help raise funds for cancer research. (Lake Cowichan Gazette/ Sept. 12, 2012)

Flashback: Terry Fox run, trigger pulled, school vending machine options

A look back at the history of the Cowichan Lake area

”Runners, walkers, bikers, and even kids in strollers head out from the start line at Saywell Park for this year’s Terry Fox Run on Sunday, Sept. 9, to help raise funds for cancer research. (Lake Cowichan Gazette/ Sept. 12, 2012)
Krystal Janicki (left) and Tiare Boyes pose for a photo with a lobster during a dive in the waters of Gros Morne National Park on the west coast of Newfoundland. (Russell Clark/RCGS)

B.C. divers help uncover Newfoundland’s lost Liberator, ending 80-year search

International team of researchers, divers confirm discovery of crashed Second World War bomber

Krystal Janicki (left) and Tiare Boyes pose for a photo with a lobster during a dive in the waters of Gros Morne National Park on the west coast of Newfoundland. (Russell Clark/RCGS)
Members of the Preston Rivulettes take a break at the bench with coach Brian Linds. From left: Morgan Yamada, Emma Rendell, Kate Dion-Richard and Becky Frohlinger. (Photo by Don Bodger)

To the victor goes the Glory

Story of relatively unknown female hockey team glides onto Chemainus Theatre stage

Members of the Preston Rivulettes take a break at the bench with coach Brian Linds. From left: Morgan Yamada, Emma Rendell, Kate Dion-Richard and Becky Frohlinger. (Photo by Don Bodger)
“From left: Dad Steve Boddam, paramedic Jamie Hockin, baby Ashtyn, big brother Lyum, and Mom, Laura Foglia.” (Lake Cowichan Gazette/Sept. 5, 2012)

Flashback: An unexpected delivery and school board expected to deliver on cost cuts

A look back at the history of the Cowichan Lake area

“From left: Dad Steve Boddam, paramedic Jamie Hockin, baby Ashtyn, big brother Lyum, and Mom, Laura Foglia.” (Lake Cowichan Gazette/Sept. 5, 2012)