Truth and Reconciliation

Senator Lillian Dyck stands outside the Senate Foyer on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Wednesday, Dec. 13, 2017. Dyck, who’s now retired, says she was “stunned” when she saw questions about the Indigenous heritage of former judge Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond, whose career she had celebrated as barrier-breaking. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

Retired Cree senator stunned by ‘facade’ of Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond’s heritage

Lillian Dyck said a CBC investigation convinced her that Turpel-Lafond lied about being Indigenous

 

The National Capital Commission is set to provide an update on the renaming of the Sir John A. Macdonald Parkway. A vehicle travels along the parkway in Ottawa, Wednesday June 2, 2021 in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Ottawa’s Sir John A. Macdonald Parkway to get an Indigenous name

Officials will engage with Indigenous communities and the public to discuss a new name

 

Commissioner Justice Murray Sinclair, Commissioner Chief Wilton Littlechild and Commissioner Marie Wilson (right to left) listen to a speaker as the final report of the Truth and Reconciliation commission is released, Tuesday, Dec. 15, 2015 in Ottawa. Seven years later, an Indigenous-led think tank says progress is moving at a “glacial pace.”THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Progress on Indigenous reconciliation calls to action going at ‘glacial pace’: report

2 of the report’s 94 calls to action completed this year — bringing the total completed so far to 13

 

Paddles were installed by Lt.-Gov. Janet Austin and T’esots’en, Patrick Kelly, a member of the award selection committee, on Nov. 22, kicking off the call for nominations for the 2023 B.C. Reconciliation Awards. (Courtesy of the Office of the Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia)

PHOTOS: Artists’ paddles hung in Victoria symbolize commitment to reconciliation

Tuesday event launches call for nominations for the 2023 B.C. Reconciliation Awards

Paddles were installed by Lt.-Gov. Janet Austin and T’esots’en, Patrick Kelly, a member of the award selection committee, on Nov. 22, kicking off the call for nominations for the 2023 B.C. Reconciliation Awards. (Courtesy of the Office of the Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia)
Jody Wilson-Raybould signs a copy of her book for Courtenay-Comox MLA Ronna-Rae Leonard during Wilson-Raybould’s induction ceremony into the Comox Valley Walk of Achievement. Photo by Terry Farrell

Reconciliation a ‘call to action to all of us,’ Jody Wilson-Raybould says in new book

Canada’s former justice minister releases ‘True Reconciliation: How to Be a Force for Change’

Jody Wilson-Raybould signs a copy of her book for Courtenay-Comox MLA Ronna-Rae Leonard during Wilson-Raybould’s induction ceremony into the Comox Valley Walk of Achievement. Photo by Terry Farrell
Diane Charles, principal, and Yutustana:t Mandy Jones, Snuneymuxw elder-in-residence at Ladysmith Secondary, pose in front of a wood box representing Coal Tyee Elementary’s name change to Syuẁén’ct Elementary School. (Karl Yu/News Bulletin)

Nanaimo school makes name change official in spirit of truth and reconciliation

Coal Tyee Elementary School now Syuẁén’ct Elementary School

Diane Charles, principal, and Yutustana:t Mandy Jones, Snuneymuxw elder-in-residence at Ladysmith Secondary, pose in front of a wood box representing Coal Tyee Elementary’s name change to Syuẁén’ct Elementary School. (Karl Yu/News Bulletin)
The ‘Every child matters’ barricade painted at the entrance to the ‘Orange Bridge’ (Riverbend Bridge) was vandalized sometime in the evening of Friday, Sept. 30, 2022. (SUSAN QUINN/ Alberni Valley News)

Vandals paint racial slur on Port Alberni’s ‘Orange Bridge’ hours after reconciliation walk

Tseshaht First Nation denounces act, says there is ‘zero tolerance’ for racism in community

The ‘Every child matters’ barricade painted at the entrance to the ‘Orange Bridge’ (Riverbend Bridge) was vandalized sometime in the evening of Friday, Sept. 30, 2022. (SUSAN QUINN/ Alberni Valley News)
People take part in ceremonies for the National Day of Truth and Reconciliation in Ottawa on Friday, Sept. 30, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Provinces, territories face calls to make Day for Truth and Reconciliation a holiday

First Nations Leadership Council deeply concerned B.C. had not made Sept. 30 a statutory holiday.

People take part in ceremonies for the National Day of Truth and Reconciliation in Ottawa on Friday, Sept. 30, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
“A Mother’s Cry” is so revered in Nisga’a culture that only the Gitmaxmak’ay Nisga’a Society dancers are permitted to perform musical narration, as seen at Salmon Fest in June 2022.

‘A Mothers Cry’ heard across B.C.’s northwest captures the pain of separation and loss

Hallowed Nisga’a song shares the anguish of stolen children and mothers’ arms left empty

“A Mother’s Cry” is so revered in Nisga’a culture that only the Gitmaxmak’ay Nisga’a Society dancers are permitted to perform musical narration, as seen at Salmon Fest in June 2022.
John Prevost uses art in his own healing journey and to help others. See story on page A6. (Arnold Lim/Black Press Media)

From residential school to prison, B.C. man has come a long way in healing journey

Decades of addiction led Vancouver Island artist John Prevost to help others

John Prevost uses art in his own healing journey and to help others. See story on page A6. (Arnold Lim/Black Press Media)
AFN National Chief RoseAnne Archibald speaks at a Miyo-wiciwitowin Day event at Mosaic Stadium in Regina, Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022. The national chief of the Assembly of First Nations says today’s National Day of Truth and Reconciliation is about the survivors who suffered in Canada’s residential schools and the children who never made it home. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Michael Bell

Canadians reflect about residential schools on Truth and Reconciliation Day

Speeches and events happen even as the grim work that helped inspire the day continues

AFN National Chief RoseAnne Archibald speaks at a Miyo-wiciwitowin Day event at Mosaic Stadium in Regina, Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022. The national chief of the Assembly of First Nations says today’s National Day of Truth and Reconciliation is about the survivors who suffered in Canada’s residential schools and the children who never made it home. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Michael Bell
Almost 7,000 people participated in the second annual Every Child Matters march in Duncan on Sept. 30, which is National Truth and Reconciliation Day. Pictured if the front of the march as people turn from Ingram Street onto Jubilee Street. (Robert Barron/Citizen)

Almost 7,000 take part in Every Child Matters march in Duncan

Sept. 30 was the second annual National Day for Truth and Reconciliation

Almost 7,000 people participated in the second annual Every Child Matters march in Duncan on Sept. 30, which is National Truth and Reconciliation Day. Pictured if the front of the march as people turn from Ingram Street onto Jubilee Street. (Robert Barron/Citizen)
Sasha Perron ran 216 kilometres in just 18 days last year – one for each child found at the site of the former Kamloops Indian Residential School, plus an extra one for all the children who weren’t found. (Arnold Lim/Black Press Media)

Next generation looks to take some of the burdens from residential school survivors

Greater Victoria’s Sasha Perron highlights survivors’ strength and resilience

Sasha Perron ran 216 kilometres in just 18 days last year – one for each child found at the site of the former Kamloops Indian Residential School, plus an extra one for all the children who weren’t found. (Arnold Lim/Black Press Media)
Shaylene Lakey grew up in Vernon in foster care and continues to live here. (Contributed)

B.C. woman shares journey to reclaim Indigenous heritage after losing it in foster care

Shaylene Lakey may have found a safe place growing up, but felt robbed of her culture

Shaylene Lakey grew up in Vernon in foster care and continues to live here. (Contributed)
Janet Hanuse (left) with her youngest child Elleanna Hunt. Their family is working on breaking the cycle of intergenerational trauma from residential schools. (Photo by Nicole Crescenzi)

Breaking the cycle: How one B.C. woman’s healing journey is being passed to her children

Janet Hanuse talks about intergenerational trauma and how it’s impacted her family

  • Sep 30, 2022
Janet Hanuse (left) with her youngest child Elleanna Hunt. Their family is working on breaking the cycle of intergenerational trauma from residential schools. (Photo by Nicole Crescenzi)
Orange Shirt Day founder Phyllis Webstad from the Stswecem’c Xgat’tem First Nation lives in Williams Lake, B.C. (Monica Lamb-Yorski photo - Williams Lake Tribune)

Orange Shirt Society founder hopeful for future of Indigenous families

B.C.’s Phyllis Webstad will be at Niagara Falls for National Day for Truth and Reconciliation

Orange Shirt Day founder Phyllis Webstad from the Stswecem’c Xgat’tem First Nation lives in Williams Lake, B.C. (Monica Lamb-Yorski photo - Williams Lake Tribune)
Assembly of First Nations National Chief RoseAnne Archibald addresses delegates at the conclusion of the AFN annual general meeting, in Vancouver, B.C., Thursday, July 7, 2022. The road to reconciliation with Indigenous Peoples in Canada remains a long one, says Assembly of First Nations National Chief RoseAnne Archibald, who estimates it will take 40 years at the current pace to achieve the more than 90 calls to action in the Truth and Reconciliation Commission report. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

National chief says Canada’s reconciliation actions taking long road; 40 years away

Archibald: ‘Progress toward addressing many of the calls to action remains slow’

Assembly of First Nations National Chief RoseAnne Archibald addresses delegates at the conclusion of the AFN annual general meeting, in Vancouver, B.C., Thursday, July 7, 2022. The road to reconciliation with Indigenous Peoples in Canada remains a long one, says Assembly of First Nations National Chief RoseAnne Archibald, who estimates it will take 40 years at the current pace to achieve the more than 90 calls to action in the Truth and Reconciliation Commission report. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Governor General of Canada Mary Simon, middle, joins dancers during a visit to Bernard Constant Community School at James Smith Cree Nation, Sask., on Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2022. Simon is to be among those speaking at a Truth and Reconciliation event in Regina today. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Heywood Yu

Governor General says education is key to reconciliation ahead of national holiday

Mary Simon says we have a shared responsibility to record and teach the true history of Canada

Governor General of Canada Mary Simon, middle, joins dancers during a visit to Bernard Constant Community School at James Smith Cree Nation, Sask., on Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2022. Simon is to be among those speaking at a Truth and Reconciliation event in Regina today. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Heywood Yu
Evelyn Voyageur is an Elder-In-Residence at North Island College Comox Valley campus. Photo courtesy NIC

National Day for Truth and Reconciliation is much more than a holiday: Island elder

Statutory holiday a call to action, but Dr. Evelyn Voyageur would like to see it recognized as more

Evelyn Voyageur is an Elder-In-Residence at North Island College Comox Valley campus. Photo courtesy NIC
Students from Tammi Greenwood’s Grade 5/6 class at Haahuupayak School wave to drivers from the newly painted portion of the Orange Bridge (Riverbend Bridge) over the Somass River, Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2002. (PHOTO COURTESY TAMMI GREENWOOD)

Port Alberni’s iconic ‘Orange Bridge’ turns orange again for Truth and Reconciliation

Tseshaht First Nation hopes bright orange accents will change narrative of bridge

Students from Tammi Greenwood’s Grade 5/6 class at Haahuupayak School wave to drivers from the newly painted portion of the Orange Bridge (Riverbend Bridge) over the Somass River, Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2002. (PHOTO COURTESY TAMMI GREENWOOD)