Some of the mushrooms brought in for identification are very interesting, like these cauliflower mushrooms. (Lexi Bainas/Gazette)

Some of the mushrooms brought in for identification are very interesting, like these cauliflower mushrooms. (Lexi Bainas/Gazette)

VIDEO: Annual Salmon and Mushroom Festival wraps after another successful weekend at Cowichan Lake

With increasing interest in the natural treats available in the woods, festival popularity grows

It’s been 18 years since Ingeborg Woodsworth, mushroom expert and gardening enthusiast extraordinaire, first decided that the world should know about the fascinating and delicious bountry to be found in the forest and rivers of the Cowichan Lake area.

She started the Salmon and Mushroom Festival, offering interested folks the chance to taste yummy food and learn about the various kinds of edible mushrooms that appear every year in the woods, just waiting for canny pickers to harvest them.

Offering opportunities to identify mushrooms and learn their characteristics, both at the festival headquarters, and out on popular mushroom walks near Woodsworth’s own property at Skutz Falls, the festival has grown, particularly since the Cowichan Valley overall profile as a foodie haven has increased.



lexi.bainas@cowichanvalleycitizen.com

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Some of the mushrooms found in the forests are really tiny, like these. (Lexi Bainas/Gazette)

Some of the mushrooms found in the forests are really tiny, like these. (Lexi Bainas/Gazette)

There are more than just mushroom people at the Salmon & Mushroom Festival. (Lexi Bainas/Gazette)

There are more than just mushroom people at the Salmon & Mushroom Festival. (Lexi Bainas/Gazette)

People can learn about mushrooms while buying mushroom products at the festival. (Lexi Bainas/Gazette)

People can learn about mushrooms while buying mushroom products at the festival. (Lexi Bainas/Gazette)