David Sidoo, of Vancouver leaves following his federal court hearing Friday, March 15, 2019, in Boston. Sidoo pleaded not guilty to charges as part of a wide-ranging college admissions bribery scandal. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Jonathan Wiggs/The Boston Globe via AP)

David Sidoo loses Order of B.C. award after guilty plea in U.S. college admission scandal

This marks the first time the award has been taken away from someone

David Sidoo, a prominent businessman has lost his Order of B.C. award after pleading guilty to charges related to the U.S. college admissions scandal.

Sidoo was praised for his philanthropy in 2016 with the award, which is for people who “have served with the greatest distinction and excelled in any field of endeavour benefiting the people of the province or elsewhere.”

This marks the first time the award has been taken away from someone. Sidoo will have to return the insignia that was presented to him four years ago.

The father of two pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud on March 13, sparking the advisory council for the award to recommend the order membership be terminated.

He was accused of agreeing to pay $100,000 to have a co-conspirator, Mark Riddell, secretly take the SAT in place of his older son. The following year, it’s alleged he agreed to pay $100,000 to have Riddell take the SAT in place of his younger son.

Sidoo has not yet been sentenced, but court documents show that lawyers representing the B.C. business man and U.S. prosecutors agreed to 90 days behind bars followed by 12 months of supervised release. The deal also entails a fine of US$250,000.

Since pleading guilty, Sidoo has stepped down from his role as president and CEO of two national energy companies, and has asked for his name to be removed from the UBC football stadium, where he played football and went on to financially support the program.

ALSO READ: Accused test-taker pleads guilty in college bribery scandal involving B.C. businessman

Another B.C. parent – Xiaoning Sui – was also caught in the large-scale bribery scheme investigation.

Sui, 49, of Surrey, was sentenced to time served after admitting to paying $400,000 to get her son into the University of California, Los Angeles, as a fake soccer recruit.

In her case, she was sentenced to time served.


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Want to support local journalism during the pandemic? Make a donation here.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Provincial COVID-19 data can now be used for B.C. to prepare for a second wave

In the past week, B.C. has seen a slight spike in daily test-positive case counts

Lake Flashback: Logging history, leaks, the EN and more

Do you remember these stories from back in the day?

‘Someone knows something’: a look into Vancouver Island missing persons with interactive map

There are more than three dozen people listed as missing throughout Vancouver Island

Mary Lowther column: Growing out your own seeds

Some crops like tomatoes don’t cross pollinate well

QUIZ: Are you ready for a summer road trip?

How much do you really know about roads, motor vehicles and car culture? Take this quiz to find out.

Beverly Hills 90210 star’s family selling Vancouver Island Beach Resort

You can own Jason Priestley’s Terrace Beach Resort in Ucluelet for less than $5 million

Genetic detectives begin work to trace spread of COVID-19 in Canada

The kinds of genetic technology being used for this project did not exist when SARS hit Canada in 2003

Sports fishers protest Fraser River Chinook closures

Public Fishery Alliance wants hatchery fish open for harvest

B.C. Ferries increasing passenger capacity after COVID-19 restrictions

Transport Canada 50-per-cent limit being phased out, no current plans to provide masks

Shellfish industry get funds to clean up at Island sites and beyond

Businesses can apply to cover half of costs to clean up so-called ‘ghost gear’

Amber Alert for two Quebec girls cancelled after bodies found

Romy Carpentier, 6, Norah Carpentier, 11, and their father, Martin Carpentier, missing since Wednesday

B.C. man prepares to be first to receive double-hand transplant in Canada

After the surgery, transplant patients face a long recovery

Grocers appear before MPs to explain decision to cut pandemic pay

Executives from three of Canada’s largest grocery chains have defended their decision to end temporary wage increases

Most Read