Duncan’s Queen Margaret’s School to go entirely co-ed

Boys will be allowed in Grades 8-12 program for first time in Sepember

Queen Margaret’s School in Duncan will switch to a totally co-ed school at the beginning of the 2019 school year for the first time in its almost 100-year history.

Currently, the university-preparatory school, known internationally for its equestrian programs, provides education to approximately 345 students each year, offering co-ed programs from pre-school through to Grade 7, with Grades 8-12 for girls only.

“Beginning in September 2019, all genders will be welcomed throughout the entirety of our school programming,” said Head of School Wilma Jamieson.

“With this decision formalized, we are moving forward with the construction of an addition to The Learning Centre. This will provide much needed instructional space for growth of our Junior School and academic program needs, further helping our staff provide the learning needed in the a world of new challenges.”

Jamieson said the new direction for the school came after a lengthy eight-month engagement and design analysis that considered future educational and economic trends, as well as an in-depth assessment of Queen Margaret’s programming strengths and opportunities.

“Our choices must prepare students for an ‘unknown’ future by ensuring that we are relevant, sustainable and able to meet the changing needs of our community,” she said.

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Queen Margaret’s School was founded by Norah Creina Denny and Dorothy Rachel Geoghegan in 1921.

In the last decade, the school has embarked on a series of improvements and building projects that reflect best practices in the ever-evolving educational landscape.

They include the construction of The Primary Centre in 2008, Rowantree Hall in 2009, and The Learning Centre in 2013.

For more information about Queen Margaret’s School, visit the school’s website at www.qms.bc.ca.



robert.barron@cowichanvalleycitizen.com

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