The investigation into the death of a Cowichan Tribes member as a result of Thursday’s windstorm continues. (Robert Barron/Citizen)

UPDATED: Falling tree kills Cowichan Tribes woman

Two men also injured, one airlifted to hospital

A Duncan woman in her late 20s has been confirmed as the victim of a wind-related accident Thursday off Sahilton Road.

Details are sparse but spokesperson Andy Watson has verified “the BC Coroners Service is in the early stages of its fact-finding investigation involving a female in her late 20s from Duncan who was involved in a fatal accident involving a tree that fell over.”

Watson said no other details are available.

The incident occured southeast of the Silver Bridge just south of Duncan around 11:25 a.m.

“The tent was occupied at the time by five people. One female was found to be deceased and two males sustained injuries,” said North Cowichan/Duncan RCMP spokesperson Cpl. Tammy Douglas in a statement. “One of the males was airlifted and the other was transported to hospital for treatment.”

Thursday saw high winds cause widespread damage throughout the Cowichan Valley, knocking down trees and power lines. BC Hydro called it one of the worst storms they’ve seen in years, with tens of thousands without power.

Friday morning, Cowichan Tribes Chief William Seymour (Squtxulenuhw) said he didn’t have much information either.

“I was down on the scene myself trying to get information,” Seymour said. “The RCMP at the time wouldn’t release anything.”

Seymour did say that his community has been talking, but a lot of information, much of it false, has been circulating.

“I do know through people texting me that we did lose somebody but there was too many names coming my way so I don’t know who,” he said. “I haven’t got the story straight. I was expecting an update this morning and I’m still waiting.”

Many questions have thus far gone unanswered but he’s working to gather information.

“I did ask questions of my community members. Are they homeless? I was told no, then I was told yes, they were living there. I was told they had kids. I’m just getting too many conflicting stories.”

Regardless, he said, it’s a tragedy.

“Any death, it doesn’t matter what time of year [is awful],” he said. “Especially this time of the year.”

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