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Lake Cowichan town council pushing proactive projects

Water system and walking bridge improvements eyed for improvement
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The town’s committee of the whole has recommend that the Town of Lake Cowichan apply for funding for the removal and reconstruction of the walking bridge from Ohtaki Park to the Riverside Park (Duck Pond). (Sarah Simpson/Gazette)

Mayor Tim McGonigle says Lake Cowichan town council is trying to be proactive with regard to two infrastructure issues around town.

First, facing a fire protection water flow problem, the town’s committee of the whole has recommended that the town charge all developments, for newly developed lots or multi-family units a fee of $1,200 per unit to undertake upgrades to the water main supply line.

“It’s for the twinning of the water delivery line that is shown to be deficient for fire flows in some of the new developments,” McGonigle explained. “We’re looking at the protection of properties and lives and if we don’t have the proper fire flow, that can impact all of the residents on their insurance costs.

“We’re trying to be proactive,” he added.

In other infrastructure maintenance news, the town’s committee of the whole has recommended that the Town of Lake Cowichan apply for funding for the removal and reconstruction of the walking bridge from Ohtaki Park to the Riverside Park (Duck Pond) through the Rural Economic Diversification and Infrastructure Program.

The existing bridge is nearing the end of its life.

“Because of the nature of the river, we can’t paint etcetera, without lots of environmental protection,” McGonigle explained. “Scraping would be problematic.”

The Rural Economic Diversification and Infrastructure Program’s first intake was Jan. 4 but McGonigle said there’s a secondary grant application window that’s coming forward in the spring “and we’ll be waiting on a response.”

If a grant can’t be secured for the bridge’s replacement, McGonigle said the town will do some maintenance for pedestrian safety at least, through their own maintenance program.

“Again, we’re trying to be proactive, not reactive.”



Sarah Simpson

About the Author: Sarah Simpson

I started my time with Black Press Media as an intern, before joining the Citizen in the summer of 2004.
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