Lindsey’s Law: New national DNA data bank honours missing B.C. woman

Vancouver Island mom Judy Peterson’s efforts result in missing persons’ DNA data bank

A Vancouver Island mom’s persistence paid off with Ottawa announcing a new National Missing Persons DNA program, intended to assist missing persons and unidentified remains investigations.

“It’s almost unbelievable,” said Judy Peterson, a Sidney resident.

“This will give me the comfort of knowing that if she is found anywhere in Canada, I would know. Also, it’s a step for the investigation itself, and I feel that now I have done everything I can to help find answers.”

It’s been 25 years since Lindsey Nicholls disappeared. She was 14 when last seen on Royston Road on the BC Day long weekend in 1993, intending to enjoy Nautical Days with friends in Comox.

Peterson spent years searching for her daughter Lindsey through poster campaigns, media releases, police investigations and the Missing Children Society of Canada.

She then started lobbying for legislation for a national missing persons’ DNA data bank.

Announced Tuesday, Legislative amendments dubbed ‘Lindsey’s Law’ enable police to expand the use of DNA analysis through a missing persons index, a human remains index, and a relatives of missing persons index. Two new criminal indexes will also be created.

What happened to Lindsey remains a mystery, but the investigation into her disappearance is ongoing. She was last seen wearing blue jeans, a khaki tank top and white canvas shoes.

Anyone with information regarding her disappearance is asked to contact the Comox Valley RCMP at (250) 338-1321 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477.

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