Editorial: PR referendum result unsurprising

In Cowichan the announcement was muted by the windstorm and the power outages that resulted from it.

The votes have been counted and British Columbia will not adopt a proportional representation system for our provincial government.

Yes, the result is in. In Cowichan the announcement was muted by the windstorm and the power outages that resulted from it.

We wrote previously about how the referendum was set up to get a “no” vote. Dividing the “yes” vote into three different options that there was little time to get people to understand spelled doom from the start. You really couldn’t blame people for sticking with what they know.

It was no surprise that areas that traditionally have skewed towards supporting the provincial Liberal Party most strongly rejected PR. The Liberals were closely aligned with the “no” side, and first past the post has tremendously benefited them in the last several decades as they formed majority governments.

All in all, the turnout was better than we expected, with 42.6 per cent of voters mailing in their ballots. Given that sometimes turnout for provincial elections isn’t too much higher than this, especially in some areas, it’s more than we hoped, though it’s still a sad number.

Think about it. Less than half of British Columbia voters could be bothered to have an opinion on how our province should be run.

The result wasn’t a landslide, but don’t expect to see the question of changing to a proportional representation system floated again any time soon. That’s why it was such a shame that the question was posed in the way it was. Previous referenda posed a much simpler question, with a specific PR system on the table. One of those votes achieved over the 50 per cent mark that was the threshold here.

This time around just over 61 per cent of voters said “no”, many of them on the rural Mainland, where the “no” side hit the 70 to 80 per cent range.

So there you have it. The status quo remains. Ultimately, it remains up to the voters to fill our provincial legislature. Let’s get those voter numbers up.

Just Posted

Chargers in every match at provincial tourney

DCS finishes 12th after competitive tournament

Lake Cowichan’s roads need assessing, so costly reconstruction can be avoided

Some work needs to be done soon or costs could skyrocket

Business notes: Chamber numbers up as new board takes over

“The deficit we have because of the Visitor Centre is a challenge”

Former Duncan man found guilty of sexual assault of 14-year-old

Corey Joseph Scribner was found guilty in a Duncan courthouse on Nov. 5

Cowichan couple gets new roof, thanks to friends and businesses

Kathy Bocking, who suffered with cancer, said it was an “incredible surprise

VIDEO: Rockslide closes Highway 93 in Fairmont Hot Springs

Geotechnical team called in to do an assessment after rocks fell from hoodoos

Province gives $4.93M boost to school-based gang prevention program

The funding will see the ‘Erase’ program expand from 12 to 16 communities

Vancouver Island town to star in new Syfy series: Resident Alien

Ladysmith will play the role of Patience, Colorado in the series

Half of shoppers say they have no holiday spending budget

B.C. consumers surveyed estimate they will spend $921 this season

Opening day delayed at Mount Washington

Dec. 6 was set as opening day but will now be delayed due to lack of snow.

Man killed in crash due to ‘absolutely treacherous’ conditions on Coquihalla

Winter means icy roads are dangerous and drivers should be careful, RCMP say

Former Burns Lake mayor gets two years for sexual assaults against minors

The Crown is seeking four to six years federal time; the defence wants 18 months in provincial jail

Bag of cocaine left in Vancouver Island grocery store aisle

RCMP: ‘We sure would like to talk to’ person who left drugs behind

RCMP officer was justified using hose in rooftop standoff: B.C. watchdog

Police watchdog finds officers actions reasonable when man injured in 2018 incident

Most Read