Illegal fireworks a bane of Halloween holiday

Fireworks are banned without permits in most areas of the Cowichan Valley, including Cowichan Tribes lands, but there are still far too many people who set them off anyway, seeming to feel they have some kind of right to do so.

They don’t have the right.

We’ve heard some of the arguments – they’ve always done it, nobody they know has ever been hurt, their parents remember doing it for a lark when they were kids – but in the end they remain unconvincing.

Unfortunately, there seems to be little enforcement or deterrent, in spite of the fact that not only are you not allowed to set them off, it’s also illegal to sell them here.

There are good reasons that these bans have been put into place.

Safety is the biggest. Almost without fail there is a report from somewhere about someone being seriously injured by one of these things.

The inherent danger of throwing around something designed to explode is exacerbated by both the inconsistency in quality of the product, and the lack of good judgement of those using them.

Let’s address that first point for a minute. Didn’t pay much for your pocketful of fireworks? There’s a good reason for that. They’re cheaply made, with little regard for who will be using them.

As to the second point, well, deciding to deliberately go out and do something that’s illegal isn’t the epitome of making good choices.

Then there’s the fact that those doing it are often young, running around in the dark, totally unsupervised, and throwing them around pretty indiscriminately without having considered the very real possible consequences. How many of those setting them off have really thought about what can happen when they toss them at, or close to, one another, somebody’s pet, or somebody’s property?

It’s a recipe for disaster. And they think it’s a lark.

It’s not so funny to the person whose pet runs away in fear, or who finds scorch marks or burn holes on their private property.

It’s time that going out around Halloween with fireworks became a lot less socially acceptable. They’re a bane of the holiday.

Just Posted

Caps fall to Wild in game four

Slow start, tough bounces and series is at 2-2

Cowichan United punches ticket to provincial U21 tournament

Cowichan United beat the odds to qualify for the U21 soccer provincial… Continue reading

Indian Day School students looking at $10K apiece in new compensation agreement

Individual students could get as much as $10K each, but must meet criteria

Cowichan Tribes cannabis partnership aims high

Costa Canna plans to open first store in Cowichan Valley and expand beyond

VIDEO: Award-winning cellist, Rebecca Wenham, performs at the Cowichan Performing Arts Centre

Principal cellist at Vancouver Opera, she brings a show called ‘Cellicious’ to Duncan

VIDEO: Can you believe it? This B.C. hill pulls cars backwards up a slope

Sir Isaac Newton had clearly never been to this Vernon anomaly when he discovered gravity

Canucks hang on for 7-4 win over Senators

Horvat nets 2 for Vancouver

European, Canadian regulators to do own review of Boeing jet

Air Canada plans to remove the Boeing 737 Max from its schedule at least through July 1

Prime minister defends Liberal budget measures as sales effort gets underway

Conservatives under Andrew Scheer say it’s a spree funded by borrowing against the future

Mayor meets with B.C. health minister on homeless taxi transfers

Two homeless people were discharged from Surrey Memorial and sent to a Chilliwack shelter

B.C. lottery winner being sued by co-workers

They claim he owes them $200,000 each, in a lawsuit filed in B.C. Supreme Court in Vancouver

Teacher reprimanded for conduct towards special needs student

Alan Stephen Berry told vice principal he did not have time to use positive strategies

‘Full worm super moon’ to illuminate B.C. skies on first day of spring

Spring has sprung, a moon named in honour of thawing soil marks final super moon until 2020

Having phone within sight while driving does not violate law: B.C. judge

The mere presence of a cell phone within sight of a driver is not enough for a conviction, judge says

Most Read