Two years on fast side for development plan

I would like to point out that in larger jurisdictions a two-year wait for a development application is considered on the fast side.

Re: “Developer frustrated by lengthy process”, (Citizen, Jan. 27)

I would like to point out that in larger jurisdictions on the lower mainland, for instance, a two-year wait for a development application is considered on the fast side.

In fact, for large projects (such as this) the process can take five or six years — sometimes even longer!

What do these jurisdictions know that we don’t know? Why is their process so much more rigorous than ours?

The Kingsview development will almost double the population in the area, have huge impacts on traffic volumes and road conditions, create environmental impacts, change the look and feel of the community, etc.

Therefore, it is sensible for the development application to proceed thoughtfully, carefully and slowly, if need be.

These developments will be around in perpetuity; we have just one chance to get it right.

It is wrong to think that developers are altruistic or focused on the greater good. Make no mistake, this is about financial profit.

Today, many communities in Canada are trying to mop up the mess brought about as a result of ill conceived ideas, poorly executed plans, lack of foresight and planning, e.g. Kelowna, Surrey, Maple Ridge, Summerland, Penticton, Abbotsford, and many more.

The impatience of a developer to make millions of dollars in profits, should not drive the process.

We need to demand that enormous projects, such as this one, contribute to the community in a positive way.

For an example of a community trying to do things right, check out the Partington Creek Plan in Coquitlam.

Development is very important and it’s even more important that it’s done right. There is no reason why it should be otherwise.

 

Vanessa Bramhill

Duncan