New Cowichan Valley Capitals defencemen Andrew Hunt (left) and Timber Lewis (right). (Submitted)

New Cowichan Valley Capitals defencemen Andrew Hunt (left) and Timber Lewis (right). (Submitted)

Caps add pair to blueline for 2018-19

New additions include CSSHL Humanitarian of the Year

Hot on the heels of the six-player trade they completed late last week, the Cowichan Valley Capitals announced two more roster additions on Tuesday.

Defencemen Timber Lewis and Andrew Hunt have committed to the Caps for 2018-19, coming up to junior A from the midget ranks.

Lewis, 17, joins the Caps from the Thompson Blazers of the BC Major Midget Hockey League where he scored six goals and assisted on 18 more for 24 points in 38 games last season. He also got into three B.C. Hockey League games with the Salmon Arm Silverbacks. The Terrace native checks in at six feet and 175 pounds.

Hunt, 18, comes to Cowichan from the Burnaby Winter Club midget prep team in the Canadian Sports School Hockey League. The six-foot-three Gibsons product compiled 22 points on three goals and 19 assists over 35 games. He also made one appearance with the BCHL’s Victoria Grizzlies.

Hunt was also named the first-ever winner of the CSSHL’s Humanitarian of the Year Award. Nicknamed “Optimistic Prime,” Hunt was known in the BWC locker room for his positive nature, something that he spread to his teammates.

According to the CSSHL website, Hunt got his teammates involved making up gift packs of food and clothing and delivering them to the Vancouver Rescue Mission. He organized a breast cancer awareness drive and created a fundraiser for the Canadian Cancer Society with the team itself raising nearly $1,000. He also organized a fundraiser for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or queer/questioning awareness and involved teammates in a discussion of inclusion and ridding hockey of homophobic slurs.

Hunt told the CSSHL website that players at that level are lucky to be where they are and should inspire others by paying it forward.

“They see us doing it and the world becomes a better place,” he said. “It reflects back on BWC and the CSSHL as a whole.”